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Tyler Stewart, Steven Page, Jim Creeggan, Kevin Hearn and Ed Robertson perform on stage during the 2018 JUNO Awards in Vancouver on March 25, 2018.

Andrew Chin/Getty Images

Barenaked Ladies and former bandmate Steven Page closed out the Juno Awards with a nostalgia-inducing performance of One Week and If I Had $1,000,000 – a reunion to mark the band’s induction into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame. But could there be more?

The band, which has sold more than 15 million records, famously split a decade ago, putting an end to the co-frontman team of Page and Ed Robertson. Page continues to record and perform as a solo artist; BNL are launching a tour in Britain this spring and have a new album out, Fake Nudes.

There was intense interest as the band, which formed in Toronto 30 years ago, prepared to reunite for the Junos.

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Speaking on the red carpet ahead of the show, Page told The Globe and Mail that playing with the group again had been “easy for the most part,” he said. “Of course there’s baggage and stuff but we’re grown-ups and we have good senses of humour and musically it’s absolutely like riding a bike. I pick up the guitar and the fingers just go in the right spot and the words are there and the harmonies are there. In a certain way, [it’s] like we’re picking up where we left off.”

In a separate interview, members of the band described the rehearsal experience in a similar way.

“It was fun and easy. We worked together for 20 years, you know. It’s familiar, it’s loose, it was good,” said Robertson.

“It felt fun. We were telling stories, laughing, jamming,” said drummer Tyler Stewart, who later described it as being “like hooking up with an ex-lover.”

“I think everybody came with an open heart,” said bassist Jim Creeggan. “The musical groove has been cut so deep over the years we’ve been together with Steve, so that was very effortless.”

When asked if there might be future performances together, Page told The Globe: “I wish I could answer that because I honestly don’t know. It’s more up to those guys than it is to me; I’d be up for more in the future. I’m not looking for a full-time job, I’m doing all right, but more opportunities to do stuff together would be great with me.”

During the band’s interview, Stewart acknowledged the public interest in the reunion. “Despite the nation’s hopes and dreams and all that stuff, we just got together and enjoyed ourselves. It sort of begins and ends there. We’re not talking about the future at all. The future we have is a U.K. tour coming up as our four-piece … so that’s really what we’re focused on. But we’re enjoying this.”

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When asked if there was any chance of a future together, keyboardist Kevin Hearn said “sure, you know, we’ll take it day by day.

“The relationship needed changes and that’s why we [split up]. But we still love the guy and maybe this will open the door to doing things like this in the future.”

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