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Former Love Inc. member Bradley Daymond co-produced dance hits such as Broken Bones and You're a Superstar before launching another stage of his career making songs with pop acts such as NSYNC.

Handout from family/The Canadian Press

Canadian songmaker Bradley Daymond scaled the charts as a member of dance trio Love Inc. – co-creating their hits Broken Bones and You’re a Superstar – but his passion for music aspired to even greater heights, which included working with NSYNC at the peak of their popularity.

The Barrie, Ont., native, who died on Aug. 3 at the age of 48 after complications from cardiac arrest, was a consistent source of energy and humour, his long-time friend Jeremy Wright said. Mr. Daymond’s traits often found their way into his zippy pop songs and remixes made for acts such as Britney Spears and Ricky Martin.

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But many will remember Mr. Daymond best for his contributions to Love Inc., the Juno-winning outfit rounded out by DJ Chris Sheppard and vocalist Simone Denny. The group delivered a number of chart-topping dance singles that played on MuchMusic and were unexpectedly embraced in Europe several years later.

Mr. Daymond’s work overflowed with bouncy synth that sometimes competed with the vocals, but at other times he’d peel back the layers of production to let the prowess of his performers shine.

His interest in music began in his teens, Mr. Wright said, around the time he began taking drum lessons with Martin Deller, a former member of Toronto band FM.

After high school, Mr. Daymond met former MuchMusic VJ Michael Williams and joined him as a composer on the 1992 Nylons album, Live to Love.

The job opened doors in Toronto’s dance-music community, which eventually led into the arms of label giant BMG Music Canada, who wanted Mr. Daymond to give his magic touch to their project Love Inc. – and be its third member.

Inside the studio, he was multitalented, vocalist Ms. Denny recalled.

“He’d arrange the music, contribute lyrically, play live instruments. He was an astounding talent as a producer,” she said. “No ego, no attitude, just a lot of excitement and enthusiasm.”

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The project was an instant success, finding its way onto dance floors and the charts in 1997. Love Inc. rode the popularity all the way to the 1999 Juno Awards, where Broken Bones won best dance recording.

But Mr. Daymond’s time with Love Inc. was brief. “He didn’t leave Love Inc. voluntarily,” Ms. Denny said. “And for me, it never felt the same.”

Mr. Daymond then teamed up with Alex Greggs to form the production duo Riprock & Alex G. They produced remixes for stars such as Ms. Spears, Mr. Martin, Jessica Simpson and Christina Aguilera that often appeared on their CD singles.

Their remixes of NSYNC’s early singles caught the ears of the group and Mr. Daymond was hired to co-write two songs for their second album, No Strings Attached, in 2000. He returned to help create three more tracks for their next album, Celebrity, a year later.

He continued writing pop music for years, on projects including Schizophrenic, the debut album of NSYNC member JC Chasez, and he served as a judge on U.S. singing competition series Popstars 2.

Ms. Denny says she recently started discussing of making new music together. She still performs Love Inc. songs when playing concerts around the world. When she heard Mr. Daymond was hospitalized several months ago in Las Vegas, Ms. Denny said she began sending him voice messages with well-wishes.

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“The last words he messaged me in audio was: ‘Gotta love each other more,’“ she said. “I think that sums up the man.”

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