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The Rolling Stones perform at the Rose Bowl Stadium, in Pasadena, Calif., on Aug. 22, 2019.

Mario Anzuoni/Reuters

The Rolling Stones on Wednesday released a previously lost track, Scarlet, recorded at guitarist Ronnie Wood’s house in 1974 and featuring Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page.

The song combines Mick Jagger’s swaggering vocal with richly textured guitars and is described in a statement as “as infectious and raunchy as anything the band cut in this hallowed era, a holy grail for any Stones devotee”.

The long-lost track also features Blind Faith’s Rick Grech on bass.

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“I remember first jamming this with Jimmy and Keith in Ronnie [Wood’s] basement studio. It was a great session,” said Jagger.

“It’s an ultra-rare appearance by me outside of Led Zeppelin in the ’70s,” said Page on his Twitter account, remembering how he had gone to Wood’s house to play some guitar solos.

“I arrived early on that evening and got to do it straight away within a few takes. It sounded good to me and I left them to it.”

Page added Jagger had contacted him recently and he got to hear the finished version.

“It sounded great and really solid.”

The Rolling Stones in April released a new track Living in a Ghost Town, part-recorded during the coronavirus lockdown.

That song, Scarlet and two other previously unreleased tracks will appear on a new multi-format version of the Stone’s 1973 album Goats Head Soup in September.

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