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CBC president and CEO Hubert LaCroix, left, talks to Tim Casgrain in Ottawa, Sept. 23, 2009. Mr. Casgrain is stepping down as chair of the CBC's board of directors.

Pawel Dwulit / CP

It's a job vacancy for the times – the CBC is looking for a new chairperson who can ensure the broadcaster "provides good value for the funding provided by taxpayers and remains viable."

A freshly posted help-wanted ad has appeared on the broadcaster's site, seeking a replacement for outgoing chairman Timothy Casgrain. Mr. Casgrain was appointed to a five-year term in 2007.

Broadcasting experience would be "considered an asset" for the part-time position, which is compensated to a maximum of just over $17,000 per annum, but it is not necessary. More important is the ability to play nice with the Conservative government through a period of tough transitions brought on by a $115-million funding reduction.

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"The qualified candidate should possess the ability to develop and maintain effective relationships with the Corporation's management, the Minister of Canadian Heritage, the Minister's Office, the Deputy Minister of Canadian Heritage and the Corporation's key stakeholders and partners," the ad reads.

Mr. Casgrain is an accountant and chairman of Skyservice Investments Inc., a charter aviation and air ambulance company based in Quebec.

The ad indicates a major priority is landing a candidate with a deep understanding of media issues who also understands "global, societal and economic trends, consumer interests, [and]the federal government's policy framework."

The CBC board includes 12 members. Five of the positions come up for renewal this year. It is charged with "the management of the corporation," and meets six times a year.

"The chairperson is primarily responsible for ensuring the effective operation of the Corporation in such a way that the Corporation carries out its mandate and objectives effectively, provides good value for the funding provided by taxpayers and remains viable."

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