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A frightening depiction of what could soon be our future, a drama based on Aldous Huxley’s dystopian novel from 1932 hits a Canadian stage for the first time in decades – and probably not a second too soon. (Dahlia Katz)
A frightening depiction of what could soon be our future, a drama based on Aldous Huxley’s dystopian novel from 1932 hits a Canadian stage for the first time in decades – and probably not a second too soon. (Dahlia Katz)

The hottest tickets in town: Five things to do in Toronto Add to ...

Brave New World

A frightening depiction of what could soon be our future, a drama based on Aldous Huxley’s dystopian novel from 1932 hits a Canadian stage for the first time in decades – and probably not a second too soon. For an ambitious production by the Dora Award-winning indie company Litmus Theatre, the Passe Muraille Mainspace has been transformed, making for an experience that is as compelling visually as it is intellectually. To Oct. 16. $22 to $38, Theatre Passe Muraille, 16 Ryerson Ave., 416-504-7529 or passemuraille.ca.

Ramblin’ Jack Elliott

At age 85, the folk-singing raconteur rambles now only in song and stories, which is more than fine enough. Ramblin’ Jack Elliott is the rare man who toured with both Woody Guthrie and Bob Dylan, and if the cowboy hat he wears is only for show, his well-weathered folk songs are the real deal.

Oct. 16, 8:30 p.m. $37.50 to $42.50. Hugh’s Room, 2261 Dundas St. W., 416-531-6604 or http://hughsroom.com/event/richard-flohil-presents-ramblin-jack-elliot/.

True Nordic

We the north? Featuring artisans such as Carl Poul Petersen, Ernst and Alma Lorenzen, Karen Bulow and many others, a significant exhibition explores seven decades of Scandinavian influence on Canadian design. Be it in pottery, furniture, glass, silver, wood or textiles, the term “Danish modern” has nothing to do with contemporary pastries and everything to do with comfortable and polite living. To Jan. 8. $9 to $15. Gardiner Museum, 111 Queen’s Park, 416-586-8080 or http://www.gardinermuseum.on.ca/exhibitions/true-nordic.

Ariodante

An opera seria in three acts by George Frideric Handel, Ariodante wallowed in obscurity for nearly two centuries after its initial success during Handel’s inaugural season at London’s Covent Garden Theatre in 1735. Here a new COC co-production is staged by the celebrated theatre and opera director Richard Jones, who has at his disposal the British mezzo-soprano Alice Coote and the Canadian soprano Jane Archibald. Oct. 16 to Nov. 4. $17.50 to $350.

Four Seasons Centre, 145 Queen St. W., 416-363-8231 or http://www.coc.ca/PerformancesAndTickets/1617Season/Ariodante.aspx.

Roger Ballen’s Theatre of the Mind

Some might know the American-born, South African-based photographer for his images that speak to humanity’s “shadow side,” while others may know him as the man responsible for the provocative video to the song I Fink U Freeky, by the South African art-rockers Die Antwoord. Things are bound to get freaky, we fink, at that band’s concert at Sound Academy on Oct. 16, while the Ballen exhibition promises to be just as convincing. To Nov. 19. Free. Izzy Gallery, 1255 Bay St., 416-922-1666 or izzygallery.com.

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