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Alex Bozikovic

Alex Bozikovic

Alex Bozikovic

Profile

Alex Bozikovic is The Globe and Mail's architecture critic. His writing appears regularly in the Arts section and in the news pages. He is an author of Toronto Architecture: A City Guide (McClelland and Stewart, 2017). He has won a National Magazine Award and has also written for design publications such as Azure, Blueprint, Dwell, Spacing and Wallpaper.

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Latest articles
Sonja Bata believed good design made lives better
Samsung’s retail ‘showroom’ adapts a new branding philosophy
Local non-profit Park People seeks pilot ideas to rethink Toronto’s outdoor spaces Subscriber content
THE CANADIAN PRESS
On the waterfront, Toronto’s next great park takes shape
Young Calgary architects working to solve the great puzzle of modern city housing
Deco, modern and what’s next? The historic home of CIBC could get a dramatic revamp
(Christopher Katsarov/The Globe
Opinion
On Montreal’s St. Catherine Street, a big dream is punctured – and for what?
Ontario home rethinks suburban norms with a highly unusual floor plan
Ben Rahn/A-Frame photo
Architecture’s future rests in the hands of robots Alex Bozikovic
Alex Bozikovic
Opinion
After years of neglect, Old City Hall deserves Toronto’s attention Alex Bozikovic
Alex Bozikovic
Opinion
Toronto has a chance to design a better future on Yonge Street Alex Bozikovic
Alex Bozikovic
The University of Toronto may have the best architecture in the city
Opinion
The Bentway's surprising success shows Torontonians are hungry for unconventional public spaces Alex Bozikovic
Alex Bozikovic
What Canada’s entry at the next Venice Biennale really means​
Changing the rules to do the right thing for Toronto’s homeless
OPINION
Toronto’s new subway stations: Design’s all right but location feels wrong
The Globe and Mail
ARCHITECTURE
The good place: Canadian architect drawn to improve Rwandan society
Stroll through Toronto’s Distillery District to discover architectural gems
The globe and mail
Towers of timber: Why wood is the future of architecture
ROM’s 1933 entrance has been reopened in a modest but symbolic architectural move