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Canadian producer prices rose by 0.5 percent in April from March, the fourth consecutive increase, on higher prices for energy and petroleum products, Statistics Canada said on Wednesday.

Of the 21 major commodity groups, prices were up in seven and down in 11, leaving three unchanged.

Energy and petroleum products prices posted a 4.5 percent gain as members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries cut production levels, putting pressure on supplies.

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Prices for electronic and telecommunications products, as well as pulp and paper products, both fell by 0.5 percent thanks to a 1.6 percent increase in the value of the Canadian dollar against the greenback in April.

Some products are priced in U.S. dollars and become cheaper when the Canadian currency strengthens.

The raw materials price index rose by 0.7 percent on higher prices for crude energy products.

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