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Report on Business Canadian companies continue to enjoy strong reputations

Companies are under more scrutiny than ever. Social media, a neverending news cycle and declining trust over all are contributing to a moment of “reputational risk," according to a new study.

But even in a challenging environment, Canadian companies are faring well, according to the Boston-based Reputation Institute. This is the fifth year that the firm has conducted its worldwide RepTrak study in Canada, and the largest study in this market so far with roughly 40,900 people surveyed and 209 companies measured. Over all, Canadian companies had a 5.2-point increase in reputation, based on the study’s 100-point scale. That’s significant because the firm says that it has seen even a one-point change correlate to significant increases in market capitalization.

The improvement was driven partly by a global trend with a particular impact in Canada: People are more inclined than ever to support companies associated with their home country. While in the past, international brands’ outsized status would help their reputation, there is now a strategic advantage in being Canadian-owned in Canada, according to the research.

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Another contributor to the increase in overall corporate reputation was an emphasis on innovation. Canadian companies over all saw a 6.5-point higher rating in a perception of being innovative, a jump that puts them on par with non-Canadian companies this year.

“That says that companies have woken up to the importance of research and development, and of investment in innovating the customer experience,” said Stephen Hahn-Griffiths, chief reputation officer at the firm. “...That’s great for the long-term economic prosperity of the country over all.”

Entertainment phenomenon Cirque du Soleil has the strongest reputation in Canada, according to the Reputation Institute’s latest study. The finding places the company in a rarefied field, with an “excellent” ranking granted to fewer than 0.01 per cent of all businesses globally.

The study’s reputation point scores are calculated by asking each person in the survey group to rate two companies with which they are familiar. Those ratings are based on their perceptions of seven factors – the company’s products and services, its level of innovation, business performance, leadership, what it is like as a workplace, its corporate citizenship and governance. Respondents are also asked to rate emotional factors, as well as their willingness to support the company, to trust it, and to become involved (by buying products, for example, or considering working there or becoming an investor).

Corporate citizenship and governance were particularly significant drivers of reputation in Canada, the study found. While reputation has been improving over all, trust has been eroding, and that could present a future risk.

“Companies need to operate ethically, to be open and transparent, to be in full disclosure of their business practices. Otherwise, it results in suspicion and suspicion can erode business reputation,” Mr. Hahn-Griffiths said.

One example is SNC-Lavalin, which had a weak reputation score, with governance and citizenship scoring particularly low. More than 59 per cent of people surveyed were unsure whether the company is ethical. And the report suggested some of that “reputational challenge” has rubbed off on the Canadian government and on the prime minister, following allegations that Justin Trudeau pressured the former attorney general to order a negotiated settlement in the criminal prosecution of the company.

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“The SNC-Lavalin scandal and the association with Trudeau has put all companies in the public light in terms of where they align in the political spectrum,” Mr. Hahn-Griffiths said. “There was a time when business and politics didn’t mix. Today, the reality is, they mix. You’ve got to tread carefully.”

Top 50 most reputable companies in Canada, 2019

RankCompanyRating
1Cirque Du SoleilExcellent
2Mountain Equipment Co-opStrong
3Jamieson Natural SourcesStrong
4CascadesStrong
5Home HardwareStrong
6Interac CorporationStrong
7The Canadian Automobile AssociationStrong
8IMAX CorporationStrong
9Canadian Tire CorporationStrong
10Metro Inc.Strong
11Saputo Inc.Strong
12Cineplex EntertainmentStrong
13DollaramaStrong
14McCain Foods Ltd.Strong
15Kal TireStrong
16Sleep Country Canada Holdings Inc.Strong
17Canadian Broadcasting CorporationStrong
18Aéroports de MontrealStrong
19VIA Rail CanadaStrong
20Roots Ltd.Strong
21WestJetStrong
22The Beer StoreStrong
23Bombardier Recreational ProductsStrong
24Royal Bank of CanadaStrong
25Hudson Bay's CompanyStrong
26Canadian NationalStrong
27Greater Toronto Airports AuthorityStrong
28Sun Life FinancialStrong
29Maple Leaf Foods Inc.Average
30Loto-QuébecAverage
31Bank of Nova ScotiaAverage
32Lululemon Athletica Inc.Average
33Bank of CanadaAverage
34Bank of MontrealAverage
35Giant Tiger Stores Ltd.Average
36Desjardins GroupAverage
37Toronto-Dominion BankAverage
38Leon's Furniture Ltd.Average
39Air TransatAverage
40Air CanadaAverage
41Loblaws Inc.Average
42Manulife Financial CorporationAverage
43George Weston LimitedAverage
44Canada Goose Holdings Inc.Average
45Groupe DynamiteAverage
46National Bank of CanadaAverage
47The Co-operatorsAverage
48Telus CorporationAverage
49Shaw CommunicationsAverage
50Husky Energy Inc.Average

Source: Reputation Institute

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