Skip to main content

Canada’s crude production will rise 33 per cent to 5.6 million barrels a day by 2035, driven by increased output from oil-sands operations, according to the industry’s main trade group.

Oil-sands production will increase 58 per cent to 4.2 million barrels a day in that period, while conventional output will remain little changed at about 1.33 million barrels, the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers said in a statement on Tuesday.

That increasing production is already running into a shortage of pipeline space, with last year’s 4.2 million barrels of oil and diluent output exceeding shipping capacity, the group said. Those bottlenecks have weighed on the relative prices Canadian crude garners from refiners and have shifted investment dollars to the U.S., according to CAPP.

Story continues below advertisement

“It is difficult for Canadian producers to ensure fair market value for our natural resources without major pipelines or access to new, emerging markets in regions such as China, India and Southeast Asia,” CAPP Chief Executive Officer Tim McMillan said in the statement.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies