Skip to main content
Complete Olympic Games coverage at your fingertips
Your inside track on the Olympic Games
Enjoy unlimited digital access
$1.99
per week for 24 weeks
Complete Olympic Games coverage at your fingertips
Your inside track onthe Olympics Games
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
// //

About 4.9 million Door Dash users, drivers and merchants had their personal information stolen during a data breach in May, says the food-delivery app company.

“Earlier this month, we became aware of unusual activity involving a third-party service provider,” the company said in a statement posted to its blog Thursday.

The California-based company launched an investigation that included outside security experts and determined some Door Dash user data was accessed on May 4.

Story continues below advertisement

It “took immediate steps to block further access” by that party and enhanced its security, the company said.

Door Dash notified law enforcement and regulators, and is assisting them in their ongoing investigation, wrote spokesperson Mattie Magdovitz in an e-mail.

About 4.9 million users who joined on or before April 5, 2018 were affected. But not all users who joined in that time frame had their information stolen, Door Dash said.

“For security reasons and because our investigation is still ongoing, I cannot get into specific details,” wrote Magdovitz, when asked why that particular date marked the cutoff.

Some Canadians had their information stolen in the breach, though the company wouldn’t say how many.

“We don’t discuss overall user, merchant or Dasher numbers publicly,” said Magdovitz.

The company operates in Calgary, Edmonton, Ottawa, Montreal, Regina, Toronto, Vancouver, Winnipeg and several other Canadian cities. However, it officially launched in some after the date in question. The company started operating in Winnipeg this May, for example, and Montreal in August.

Story continues below advertisement

The stolen data may include profile information, such as users’ names, e-mail addresses, delivery addresses and phone numbers. It may also include “hashed, salted passwords,” which the company said make the actual password indecipherable to a third party.

It appears some consumers also had the last four digits of their payment cards taken, while some drivers and merchants had the last four digits of their bank account numbers stolen.

However, the company said the perpetrator or perpetrators did not obtain enough information to make fraudulent charges or withdrawals.

About 100,000 drivers had their driver’s license numbers stolen.

The company has now reached out to all affected users, said Magdovitz.

It is encouraging users to change their passwords via a dedicated reset site, and has set up a call centre for round-the-clock support.

Story continues below advertisement

The Door Dash breach is one of several large-scale privacy invasions in recent years.

A data breach at Capital One in July exposed the data of about six million Canadians, including roughly a million social insurance numbers, as well as the data of about 100 million American clients.

In June, Desjardins Group revealed a data breach there affected nearly three million members, including individuals and businesses. Names, addresses, birthdates, social-insurance numbers and other private information was leaked.

And in 2017, some 19,000 Canadians had their data compromised as part of a broader breach at Equifax Inc. The breach impacted nearly 150 million people, including the Canadians.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies