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The donor: Sheldon Inwentash

The gift: $625,000

The cause: Children’s Aid Foundation of Canada

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The reason: To fund the Lynn Factor Stand Up for Kids Award

Lynn Factor and Sheldon Inwentash

George Pimentel

Lynn Factor has spent 35 years working in the field of social work, helping some of the most vulnerable children deal with abuse, neglect and trauma. Her efforts have earned her numerous awards including the Order of Canada.

Now, thanks to a $625,000 gift from her husband, Toronto investment manager Sheldon Inwentash, the Children’s Aid Foundation of Canada has named its new award in her honour. The annual Lynn Factor Stand Up for Kids National Award will provide a $75,000 grant to someone working with at-risk children and youth. The first award will be announced in September. It’s part of the foundation’s $60-million fundraising drive to fund a national child-welfare program that focuses on education, health and inclusion.

“Lynn is the real deal,” said Mr. Inwentash, chief executive of Toronto-based ThreeD Capital Inc. The couple met on a blind date more than 30 years ago when Ms. Factor was a frontline worker for the Children’s Aid Society in Oshawa, Ont. Her dedication to that work ever since has inspired many others, Mr. Inwentash added. “A lot of people never really wanted to touch this area. Now, because of Lynn people want to help and they are stepping forward.”

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