Skip to main content

Business Briefing Canada shines on list of most ‘livable’ cities: Where Calgary, Vancouver, Toronto, Montreal rank

Briefing highlights

  • Canada boasts ‘livable’ cities
  • Nissan chief resigns over pay
  • Stocks, loonie, oil at a glance
  • BA cancels flights amid strike
  • Required Reading

Canada boasts ‘livable’ cities

Canada and Australia dominate the top in a ranking of the world’s most “livable” cities.

Each country has three in the top 10 of the Economist Intelligence Unit's annual study of 140 cities.

Calgary ranks No. 5 and Vancouver No. 6, while Toronto shares seventh spot with Tokyo. Montreal is also on the list, ranked No. 20.

Story continues below advertisement

The top findings are similar to those of last year, though Calgary has slipped one notch in the study of several factors, including stability, health care, culture and environment, education and infrastructure.

Vienna leads the rankings, with a score of 99.1 out of 100, followed by Melbourne, Sydney, Osaka and Calgary to round out the top five.

Calgary scored 97.5, Vancouver 97.3 and Toronto 97.2.

"Over all, our index remains dominated by medium-sized cities in wealthy countries," said the group, a sister company to The Economist magazine.

"These cities have well-funded public health care systems, compulsory and high-quality education, and functional road and rail infrastructure," it added.

"The provision of these services is assisted by the presence of fully democratic electoral systems and generally low levels of corruption."

The least livable cities include Karachi, Tripoli, Dhaka, Lagos and, at the bottom, Damascus.

Story continues below advertisement

Nissan chief resigns

Nissan Motor Co. chief executive officer Hiroto Saikawa resigned today after admitting and apologizing for receiving questionable compensation.

“Hiroto Saikawa had indicated recently his willing to resign,” Nissan said in a statement after a scheduled board meeting.

“After discussion, the board asked him to resign as representative executive officer and CEO of the company, effective Sept. 16, and he accepted.”

Yasuhiro Yamauchi, now chief operating officer, will become acting CEO, the company said.

Read more

Markets at a glance

Read more

Ticker

Oil prices rise with new Saudi minister

From Reuters: Oil prices rose on Monday after the new Saudi Arabian energy minister, Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman, confirmed expectations that there would be no radical change in his country’s oil policy.

Story continues below advertisement

BA cancels flights amid strike

From Reuters: British Airways pilots began a two-day strike Monday, grounding nearly all of its flights and disrupting thousands of passengers in a dispute over pay. The airline cancelled 1,700 flights to and from London’s Heathrow and Gatwick airports on Monday and Tuesday ahead of action by British Airline Pilots Association members in BA’s first ever pilot strike.

Wells Fargo sees slower net interest income

From Reuters: Wells Fargo said Monday it expects full year 2019 net interest income to fall 6 per cent from a year earlier due to lower interest rates, a flatter yield curve and asset sales.

Elliott urges AT&T to sell assets

From Reuters: AT&T Inc. shareholder Elliott Management Corp. on Monday called for the wireless carrier to sell some of its non-core businesses and cut costs in an effort to return more value to shareholders, sending its shares up 10 per cent.

Story continues below advertisement

U.S. judge rejects Purdue bid

From Reuters: The U.S. judge overseeing nationwide litigation concerning the opioid crisis on Monday rejected Purdue Pharma LP’s effort to dismiss claims that its activities caused a public nuisance.

Japan’s growth slower than believed

From Reuters: Japan’s economy grew at a slower pace than initially estimated in the second quarter as the U.S.-China trade war prompted a downward revision of business spending, intensifying calls for the central bank to deepen stimulus this month. The economy grew an annualized 1.3 per cent in April-June, revised Cabinet Office data showed Monday, weaker than the preliminary reading for 1.8 per cent.

Required Reading

Detached housing market in 905 breaks out of slump

Sales of detached houses in the suburban 905 region outside Toronto are leaping higher after a two-year slump, posting gains of 20 per cent or more in every month since April, Janet McFarland reports.

Story continues below advertisement

Whither Cenovus

Share buybacks could be the remedy for Cenovus Energy Inc.’s two-year hangover, Andrew Willis writes.

Look at international investing

The stay-at-home approach to investing isn’t as logical as Canadians may think, Ian McGugan says.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter