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BP plans to repurchase $1.4-billion in shares in the coming months after generating surplus cash of $2.4-billion in the first half of the year, it said.

GLYN KIRK/AFP/Getty Images

BP PLC boosted its dividend and share buybacks on Tuesday, sending its shares up by more than 5 per cent, after beating expectations with a US$2.8-billion second-quarter profit powered by higher oil prices and recovering demand.

The strong results, underpinned by higher sales at petrol stations, went some way toward easing investors’ concerns over BP’s plan to shift away from oil and gas to renewable and low-carbon energy to combat climate change.

The 4-per-cent dividend increase coupled with a US$1.4-billion share repurchase over the next three months drove BP shares 5.6 per cent higher, exceeding peers Royal Dutch Shell PLC and TotalEnergies, which were up by more than 2 per cent.

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Tuesday’s announcement brings BP’s total shareholder payouts in 2021 to around £4.4-billion (US$6.13-billion), representing more than 7 per cent of its market capitalization, said Russ Mould, investment director at AJ Bell.

BP, which plans to reduce its oil output by 40 per cent or one million barrels a day by 2030, generated surplus cash of US$2.4-billion in the first half of the year.

“Investors must now weigh up whether that return offers more than compensation for the risks associated with owning BP’s stock, as the company tries to maximize the value of its existing hydrocarbon assets... while investing in renewables,” Mr. Mould said.

Rivals, including Shell, TotalEnergies and Chevron, also boosted shareholder returns last week, reflecting a recovery from the impact of the pandemic on energy demand.

BP increased its dividend to 5.46 US cents after it was halved to 5.25 US cents in July, 2020, for the first time in a decade.

The company is repurchasing shares after in April announcing a US$500-million buyback plan to offset dilution from an employee share distribution program.

Chief executive Bernard Looney said stronger performance and an improving outlook would allow the company to press ahead with a shift to cleaner energy.

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“The strengthening of the balance sheet and the excess cash flow allow us to prosecute our agenda around the energy transition,” Mr. Looney told Reuters.

BP expects global oil demand to recover to pre-pandemic levels in the second half of 2022.

Its underlying replacement cost profit, the company’s definition of net earnings, reached US$2.8-billion in the second quarter, beating the US$2.15-billion expected by analysts.

That was up from US$2.63-billion in the first quarter and marked a rebound from a loss of US$6.68-billion a year earlier.

The results were also buoyed by stronger demand for fuel, including aviation fuel, and higher profit margins at convenience stores in BP’s petrol stations, it said.

BP’s net debt fell dropped to US$32.7-billion from US$40.1-billion.

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STRONGER OUTLOOK

BP said it has increased its price forecast for benchmark Brent crude oil to 2030 to reflect expected supply constraints, while also lowering its longer-term price forecast because it expects an acceleration in the transition to renewable energy.

As a result, the company increased the pre-tax value of its assets by US$3-billion, after writedowns of more than US$17-billion last year.

The company said at an oil price of US$60 a barrel, it expects to be able to buy US$1-billion in shares and boost its dividend by 4 per cent annually through 2025.

Brent oil prices rose in the second quarter to an average of US$69 a barrel from US$61 in the previous quarter and from US$29.56 a year earlier.

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