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Mexico’s economy shrank by a record 17% during April as the coronavirus lockdown devastated economic activity, official data showed on Friday, and recovery is expected to be a long, hard slog with new infections still surging.

With factories closed, manufacturing took a big hit. So did hotels, restaurants and retail as consumers stayed home.

Adjusted for seasonal swings, Latin America’s second-biggest economy contracted 17.3% from March, the biggest fall since modern data began being published in early 1993, according to figures put out by national statistics agency INEGI.

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The decline, however, was milder than the 19.4% drop forecast by a Reuters poll of economists. In unadjusted terms, the economy shrank 19.9% in April compared with a year earlier.

The figures suggested gross domestic product (GDP) will decline 16% in the second quarter versus the previous quarter, said Joan Domene, senior economist at Oxford Economics.

“The uncontrolled spread of the virus prevents a timely and swift reopening, which adds a substantial risk to our third quarter forecast,” Domene added.

Mexico has the seventh highest coronavirus death toll in the world with 25,060 deaths and 202,951 cases.

A breakdown of the data showed that primary activities such as farming, fishing and mining shrank 6.4% from March. Secondary activities, which include manufacturing, plummeted 25.1% and tertiary activities, which cover the service sector, fell 14.4%.

Auto production almost ground to a halt in April, falling by 98.8% on the year, and the main industry group forecast output in the sector could drop by nearly a third in 2020.

The government hopes the economy fared slightly better in May, when authorities gradually began to permit sectors such as carmaking, mining and construction to start up again.

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Still, the government’s reluctance to spend to support businesses and workers is seen weighing on the recovery.

That spending is worth only 1.0-1.5% of GDP and consists of “narrow-based and poorly targeted measures, with extremely limited support for the productive sector of the economy,” said Goldman Sachs economist Alberto Ramos.

This will likely to lead to a “deeper contraction and a shallower recovery,” Ramos added.

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