Skip to main content

Amazon.com Inc. will only receive vital supplies at its U.S. and U.K. warehouses until April 5, its latest move to free up inventory space for medical and household goods in high demand as a result of the coronavirus outbreak.

The change does not mean that Amazon will stop selling non-essential items like books and toys for now, only that products may be more likely to run out of stock in the next few weeks or sellers will have to ship the products directly to consumers themselves.

In a note sent to sellers on Tuesday, Amazon said it is seeing increasing online shopping demand from consumers. As its household staples and medical supplies are running out of stock, it will prioritize certain categories in order to “quickly receive, restock and ship these products to customers.”

Story continues below advertisement

Amazon defined several categories as essential products that can continue shipping, including baby products; health and household items; beauty and personal care; grocery; industrial and scientific; and pet supplies.

“We understand this is a change for our selling partners and appreciate their understanding as we temporarily prioritize these products for customers,” Amazon said in a statement.

The company said the new protocol applies to both first-party vendors and third-party sellers. That suggests the company is not protecting its own products.

The move follows Amazon’s announcement it will hire 100,000 workers for its warehouses on Monday, as the Seattle-based giant is trying to meet growing online shopping need from people who stay home amid the coronavirus outbreak.

Third-party sellers account for over half of the sales on Amazon. The online retailer has been courting sellers to use its own fulfilment system, enabling many of them with faster delivery without the risks of sitting on inventories.

It is especially popular for sellers who use a dropping shipping method, meaning sellers import products from manufacturers in countries including China and directly send them to an Amazon warehouse. Amazon earns fees from managing the storage and delivery process.

Sellers supplying products that are deemed non-essential could see their products run out of stock and they will be unable to restock as a result of the measure. Still, they can use other fulfilment methods to directly mail products to customers.

Story continues below advertisement

One consultant said the announcement landed as third-party sellers were grappling with economic uncertainty amid the outbreak. Workers at bars, gyms, theatres and other non-essential businesses are furloughed to help contain the spread of the deadly virus and U.S. President Donald Trump on Monday said the country’s economy may be sliding into recession.

“Sellers are rethinking their entire strategies for selling in 2020, not just Q1 and Prime Day,” said Chris McCabe, founder of Amazon seller consultancy ecommerceChris.com.

Prime Day, scheduled for July every year, is Amazon’s annual marketing blitz when sellers offer exclusive deals and discounts that contribute more sales than Black Friday. Sellers usually stock up on inventory ahead of the shopping holiday, while this decision adds uncertainty to when they could ship products in.

“Just posting this announcement has a big impact on Prime Day,” Mr. McCabe said.

Coronavirus information
Coronavirus information
The Zero Canada Project provides resources to help you manage your health, your finances and your family life as Canada reopens.
Visit the hub
Report an error
Tickers mentioned in this story
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies