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Apple's vice president of Platform Architecture Tim Millet debuts the new A14 Bionic chip of the all-new iPad Air during a special event at the company's headquarters of Apple Park in a still image from video released in Cupertino, California, U.S. Sept. 15, 2020.

APPLE INC/Reuters

Apple Inc rolled out a new virtual fitness service and a bundle of all its subscriptions, Apple One, focusing a holiday season product launch on services that are the backbone of Apple’s growth strategy and cater to customers working at home during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Apple also introduced a new Apple Watch Series 6 that monitors blood oxygen for $399 (£309.33) and a lower-cost Apple Watch SE for $279.

The Apple One bundle will cost $15 per month for an individual plan or $20 per month for a family plan and include television, music and games. Apple is also offering a premier bundle for $30 per month that adds news, the fitness service and more storage.

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Apple rolled out a new virtual fitness service and a bundle of all its subscriptions, Apple One, focusing a holiday-season product launch on services that are the backbone of Apple's growth strategy and that cater to customers working at home during the COVID-19 pandemic. Reuters

Apple said both new watches can be pre-ordered starting Tuesday and will be available on Friday. Apple also introduced a service called Apple Fitness+ powered by its watches that will deliver virtual workouts for $10 per month or $80 per year and be available before the end of the year.

Apple’s biggest seller – the iPhone – is expected to be announced next month after executives have said its launch will be delayed by several weeks because of pandemic-related disruptions.

Apple shares have soared this year even as the virus has crippled economies around the world, thanks in large part to booming sales of work-from-home items.

Apple shares were up 2 per cent on Tuesday after climbing more than 50 per cent for the year, well ahead of the 23 per cent gain for the Nasdaq. Even though Apple stock has fallen from a record high earlier this month, it remains near its $2 trillion stock market valuation.

How the new products sell during the holiday shopping season in many markets will largely define how well Apple performs for its entire fiscal year, which started this month.

Apple said the Series 6 watch’s new ability to monitor blood oxygen using infrared light should be used for fitness and wellness purposes. Apple said flu investigators in Washington state will study heart rate and blood oxygen data from Apple Watch for potential early signs of respiratory conditions like influenza and COVID-19.

Doctors in India and other countries have used pulse oximeters to remotely check on COVID-19 patients and ensure their oxygen saturation level does not fall too low.

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A level between 95 per cent and 97 per cent is considered normal by the American Lung Association. Patients below 95 per cent should call their doctor and those under 90 per cent should go to the emergency room, health experts advise.

Low oxygen levels are usually not the sole indicator of having COVID-19, the association said.

The previous version of the Apple Watch can already take measurements similar to electrocardiogram.

Apple’s Heart Study found that the watch could accurately detect atrial fibrillation, the most common type of irregular heartbeat, according to a study that explored the role of wearable devices in identifying potential heart problems. Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke more than five-fold, according to the American Heart Association.

Apple rival Fitbit Inc introduced a way to measure changes in blood oxygen earlier this year.

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