Skip to main content
Welcome to
super saver spring
offer ends april 20
save over $140
Sale ends in
$0.99
per week for 24 weeks
Welcome to
super saver spring
$0.99
per week for 24 weeks
save over $140
// //

A Boeing 737 Max airplane lands after a test flight at Boeing Field in Seattle, Washington, U.S. June 29, 2020.

Karen Ducey/Reuters

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said on Tuesday it plans to issue a proposed airworthiness directive for the Boeing 737 Max in the “near future” to address changes made since the plane was grounded in March 2019 after two fatal crashes killed 346 people.

An official briefed on the matter told Reuters that the FAA is unlikely to unground the 737 Max before sometime in October. Boeing Co has said it expects to resume deliveries before Sept. 30 following regulatory approval.

Boeing spokesman Gordon Johndroe said the schedule for the jet’s return to service will be determined by regulators.

Story continues below advertisement

“Boeing is working closely with the FAA and other international regulators to meet their expectations as we work to safely return the 737 Max to service,” Johndroe said.

The crisis over the grounding of the once top-selling 737 Max has cost the U.S. planemaker more than $18 billion, slashed production and hobbled its supply chain, with criminal and congressional investigations still ongoing.

The FAA said the public will have 45 days to comment on “proposed design changes and crew procedures to mitigate the safety issues identified during the investigations that followed the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines accidents.” The FAA noted there are still some key steps before the plane can resume commercial service.

On July 1, the FAA said it had completed three days of certification test flights on the 737 Max’s automated flight control system.

Final planning is under way for the FAA’s Flight Standardization Board (FSB) and the Joint Operations Evaluation Board (JOEB) review of proposed training for flight crews, based on design changes and crew procedures.

The JOEB will include regulators from Canada, Europe and Brazil and will evaluate minimum pilot training requirements. The FSB will issue a draft report for public comment addressing JOEB findings.

The FAA will review Boeing’s final design documentation to evaluate compliance with regulations and the multi-agency Technical Advisory Board will review the final Boeing submission and issue a report prior to a final FAA determination of compliance.

Story continues below advertisement

Boeing agreed to add significant safeguards to a key safety system tied to both crashes, make other software updates and move wiring bundles.

Be smart with your money. Get the latest investing insights delivered right to your inbox three times a week, with the Globe Investor newsletter. Sign up today.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error
Tickers mentioned in this story
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies