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A Starbucks cafe is seen at Dubai International Airport sits closed on April 27, 2020.

Ahmed Jadallah/Reuters

Starbucks Corp on Tuesday reported a larger-than-expected fall in quarterly sales as the renewed surge in coronavirus cases in the United States kept customers at home.

The world’s largest coffee chain’s global same-store sales fell 5 per cent in its first quarter, which ended Dec. 27, more than analysts’ estimates of a 3.4 per cent decline, according to Refinitiv IBES data.

Shares fell slightly in extended trading.

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The second wave of COVID-19 infections and accompanying restrictions dented traffic at the coffee chain’s stores, hampering its efforts to boost demand through product launches and new drive-thrus.

Comparable sales declined 6 per cent for the Americas region, compared with a 5.2 per cent fall expected by analysts.

But in China, Starbucks’ biggest growth market, comparable sales rose 5 per cent as the company benefited from the popularity of its rewards program and the return of pre-coronavirus consumer habits.

Customers also spent more money per order, helping to offset fewer transactions.

For the second quarter, Starbucks said it expects U.S. comparable sales to rise between 5 per cent and 10 per cent, while in China they were forecast to grow nearly two-fold a year after the pandemic hit the region.

The company did not change its guidance of an expected rebound overall this year, with global comparable sales expected to rise 18 per cent to 23 per cent in 2021.

Starbucks also said Chief Operating Officer Roz Brewer would be leaving the company next month to take a chief executive officer role at another company.

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Net revenue fell 5 per cent to $6.7 billion, missing expectations of $6.93 billion.

The Seattle-based company has been closing some stores, adding drive-thrus to others, remaking some with smaller cafes and building a few with no seating at all as it focuses on expanding to-go options.

Overall, the company opened 278 net new stores in the quarter, for 4 per cent year over year growth. It now has 32,938 stores around the world, 51 per cent of which are company-operated.

Starbucks also saw coffee lovers return to its Rewards loyalty program, with its count of 90-day active U.S. members increase 15 per cent year over year to 21.8 million.

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