Skip to main content
Complete Olympic Games coverage at your fingertips
Your inside track on the Olympic Games
Enjoy unlimited digital access
$1.99
per week for 24 weeks
Complete Olympic Games coverage at your fingertips
Your inside track onthe Olympics Games
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
// //

United Airlines commercial jets sit at a gate at Newark Liberty International Airport, in Newark, N.J., on July 18, 2018.

The Associated Press

United Airlines is in talks to place a multi-billion-dollar order for single-aisle jets potentially split between Boeing and Airbus, industry sources said.

If confirmed, the deal could include over 100 of Boeing’s 737 Max 8 and several dozen larger Airbus A321neo jets, they said, asking not to be identified.

The carrier is looking to upgrade its fleet at a time when travel is surging in the United States, according to Bloomberg News, which first reported the Boeing negotiations.

Story continues below advertisement

That portion of the order could include 150 Max, it said.

“We do not currently have a deal in place with Boeing or Airbus to purchase new aircraft and do not comment on speculative aircraft orders,” United spokesperson Luke Punzenberger said in response to the earlier report.

Boeing and Airbus both said they do not comment on customer discussions.

In March, United ordered 25 new Boeing 737 Max aircraft, as it prepares to replace aging jets and meet post-pandemic demand growth.

Bookings for U.S. airlines are expected to rebound this year on the back of COVID-19 vaccinations and easing restrictions after the pandemic caused the industry’s worst downturn.

A deal split between the 168-seat Boeing 737 Max 8 and the roughly 200-seat A321neo would deliver a broad boost to the aerospace sector as it clambers out of the COVID-19 crisis.

It would bolster Boeing’s main cash cow, the Max 8, after a safety grounding while reinforcing a trend toward Airbus at the higher end of the busy single-aisle segment that threatens to alter the product lineup in their transatlantic duopoly.

Story continues below advertisement

Airbus’ A321neo has snapped up a dominant share of orders in the recently booming large single-aisle segment, prompting Boeing to weigh a replacement for its out-of-production 757, which overlaps with the A321neo in size and range.

Be smart with your money. Get the latest investing insights delivered right to your inbox three times a week, with the Globe Investor newsletter. Sign up today.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error
Tickers mentioned in this story
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies