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Whether you’re a seasoned leader or fresh out of undergrad, find the best executive education program for you. Plus: No matter which program you choose, your business education will likely take you overseas. We bring you an etiquette primer to help you survive the experience gaffe-free.

Make a good first impression

No matter where you’re headed, it’s important to master a few words and phrases in advance. if you want to further impress your colleagues, here are some country-specific tips when it comes to verbal and body language

Sam Island/ The Globe and Mail

JAPAN Though handshakes are becoming more common in Tokyo, the proper greeting is still a bow. While men keep their arms at their sides, women place their hands together in front. When first going into the office, greet people with “ohayou gozaimasu,” which technically means “it’s early.” Generally, less is more when it comes to verbal communication. While Canadians tend to fill awkward pauses during meetings, the Japanese are okay with silence. So refrain from talking too much.

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BRAZIL The annals of business gaffery are filled with tales of foreign executives speaking Spanish in Brazil—only to be reminded that it is, in fact, a Portuguese-speaking country. Address your colleagues with the more formal “o senhor” (sir) and “a senhora” (ma’am), especially if they’re older than you.

CHINA Being humble is key, and that can be reflected in the phrases you use. When meeting someone, follow the formal version of “hello” (nın hao) with “so happy to meet you” hen gao xìng rèn shì nı). This is also a respectful way to set up a business card exchange. If you’re not sure of someone’s name, politely ask “zen me cheng hu nín,” which translates to “how should I call you?” Then be sure to use their title and surname, such as Manager Chen or President Yang.

FRANCE If you decide to practise your Grade 9 French, first apologize for your rusty linguistic skills, then address your colleagues with the royal “vous” in meetings and save the informal “tu” for close friends. (And don’t be offended if your colleagues revert to English.)

HONG KONG Hierarchy and respect are important, so greet the most senior person first, and don’t contradict your superiors in front of others. Always address your colleagues by their title and surname. When saying “thank you” for a gift, use the more formal “do jeh.” Keep the informal “m’goi” for when a shopkeeper helps you.

THAILAND Even if you’re speaking English, politely end your sentences with formal punctuation. For women, that’s “ka”; for men, it’s “krub.” So a woman would say: “It was a pleasure to meet with you ka.” And a man would respond: “Thank you for taking the time krub.”

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES When someone greets you with “as-salamu alaikum” (peace be upon you), reply with “wa-alaikum assalam” (and unto you, peace). Also, always greet the most senior person in the room first and offer your business card with your right hand (the left is considered unclean).

Business etiquette in ... Italy

By Eric Reguly, The Globe and Mail’s European bureau chief

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LATE IS EARLY Italians are notoriously late for everything. If you show up precisely on time, no one will be there. A former Canadian ambassador to Rome once told me that Italian diplomat guests would routinely arrive two full hours after the appointed dinner time, when the meal was rather cold. For business meetings, 15 to 20 minutes late is pretty much right on time.

DRESS FOR SUCCESS In a country famous for bella figura—loosely translated as “good impression”—looking good is important, especially in Milan, the business centre, where cab drivers are better dressed than your average North American. For any meeting, err on the side of conservative, but not stuffy. For men, dark suits; for women, fashionable pantsuits or skirts. Lipstick is the law and, for men, shorts will land you in prison. Remember that springs, summers and autumns in Italy are warm to hot, so ditch the wools that you might wear in Canada or northern Europe. In the cooler months, a dashing scarf is always a good idea, for both men and women.

KISSY, KISSY Italians are famously affectionate and physical, and there is little sense of personal space in the high-density cities. But for God’s sake, do not hug, kiss or air-kiss anyone on first encounter. A firm handshake is expected. After several meetings with the same people, the rules can be relaxed somewhat.

WHAT WAS YOUR NAME? Business cards are still very much part of the first-meeting ritual in Italy, so stuff a few in your pocket before you head out. As a sign of respect, glance at the business cards given to you before you fling them into your purse or wallet.

LINGUA FRANCA Italians know that English is the language of business—especially in Milan—and will not expect you to speak Italian to them. But to make an instant good impression, and to flatter them, learn a few words before you head to Italy. Buon giorno (good day or hello), arrivederci (see you later), grazie (thank you), è stato un piacere (it was a pleasure), buona sera (good evening) and a few other terms will win you big points. You do not want to be the Ugly Canadian who can’t be bothered to learn simple Italian courtesies.

NO PRESSURE, PLEASE Italian businesspeople don’t like to be pressured, so don’t demand a commitment on the first meeting. If you do, they will suspect they are being railroaded into a bad deal. Initial meetings are get-to-know-you affairs, where pitches, personalities and trustworthiness are evaluated.

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BONUS TIPS Italians almost never get drunk, but they almost always have a glass, maybe two, of wine with dinner, so enjoy. Business meetings in caffè bars are not the thing to do. In Italy, a caffè is drunk quickly, then you leave. No one lingers, as you might at a Starbucks. And drinking a cappuccino after about 10 a.m. is considered the mark of the rube. A cappuccino is a breakfast drink, never a lunch or dinner drink. So don’t embarrass yourself.

Business etiquette in ... Brazil

By Stephanie Nolen, The Globe and Mail’s former Latin American bureau chief

PUCKER UP There’s a lot of kissing and hugging in Brazil, even in business settings. Men might settle for a straight-up vigorous handshake on first meeting with other men, but if you know each other even vaguely, you will shake with your right hand, while firmly clasping the person’s shoulder with your left and leaning in a bit. If you have a professional relationship that could be considered warm, be prepared to hug with a lot of back-slapping. But for women greeting women, or men greeting women, it’s kissing. In Rio, it’s two kisses, one on each cheek. In São Paulo, it’s one kiss (except when Paulistas suddenly go rogue and do three kisses). Pay close attention, because if you’re doing one and the other person is planning two or three, you’re going to end up with your lips in someone’s ear, and let me tell you, it’s terribly awkward. If a colleague joins a meeting late, he or she will go around the room to kiss everyone and exchange pleasantries.

MAKE SMALL TALK Never plunge right into business. Brazilians love to hear what you think of Brazil—it’s so big, it’s so beautiful, people are lovely. This is a popular line of conversation that has the advantage of also being true. Brazilians, however, also make a national pastime of complaining bitterly about how bad things are, and it will serve you well to know a bit about the never-ending corruption scandal known as Lava Jato and the latest drama in Brasilia. As a foreigner, you will have a damnably difficult time with licences, investing, hiring, and moving money in and out, and Brazilians have a healthy appetite for hearing about it, and will commiserate.

HURRY UP AND WAIT Budget double what seems like a reasonable length of time to get anywhere in either Rio or São Paulo, because traffic is outrageous and entirely unpredictable. But if you arrive early, loiter outside. Brazilian office meetings usually run more or less on time, but the concept is much more fluid for social events. More than once, I turned up at the polite Canadian 8:15 for an 8 p.m. invitation, and was greeted by alarmed hosts who had not expected me for another hour.

MAYBE MEANS NO Brazilians are loath to say no or overtly disappoint. So don’t assume something is happening or confirmed until it’s actually done. If the assistant is assuring you Mr. da Costa really wants to make the meeting happen, but somehow you just can’t seem to nail down a time—Mr. da Costa does not, in fact, want to see you.

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The art of wining and dining

HONG KONG During a meeting, tea will likely be served. Be sure to allow your host to take the first sip. When he or she stops drinking, it might be a sign that the meeting is over.

CHINA Most meals will be served from communal dishes. Always use the serving chopsticks to take food from the main dish, never your own. Dinner is not the time for talking shop, so don’t be surprised if your counterpart invites you to a tea shop, massage parlour or even a karaoke bar to discuss business.

CHILE Don’t touch your food with your hands—always use a fork and knife, even for French fries.

ITALY Mid-range restaurants don’t always have side plates for bread, so it’s fine to put it directly on the table. Remember that bread is for eating with your meal, to sop up any delicious sauce your pasta missed.

KOREA Never pour your own drink. Instead, pour for your colleagues, and they will do the same for you.

SPAIN Always accept a colleague’s invitation to a meal (even before or after your meeting). Food is an important part of Spanish culture.

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THAILAND Don’t ask for chopsticks if you’re eating a dish with rice on a plate—just use the fork and spoon that are provided. Thai people think Westerners are strangely fixated on chopsticks.

U.K. When out for drinks with British counterparts, buy a round of drinks for each person at your table. Everyone at the table will take a turn.

Who pays the bill?

AUSTRALIA Whoever financially benefits from the meeting pays the bill.

GERMANY The host will pay, but he or she might do so with cash—plastic isn’t universally accepted in all businesses.

HONG KONG Paying the bill is considered an honour and is usually reserved for the person who invited everyone. Never offer to split the bill. If you’re the host, let your server know when you’re ready for the cheque—otherwise, he or she won’t bring it.

INDIA At restaurants, the host usually pays. However, you might be asked to a colleague’s home for lunch or dinner instead. When the meal is done, don’t say “thank you,” which is considered insincere. Instead, tell your host how much you enjoyed the meal.

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KOREA When a higher-ranking colleague insists on paying the bill, let it happen (although it’s polite to at least attempt to pay).

MEXICO Be polite and offer, but Mexican business people likely won’t let you cover a meal.

UAE The host always pays, and it would be rude to even offer to cover the meal as a guest.

Business etiquette in ... China

By Nathan VanderKlippe, The Globe and Mail’s Asian bureau chief

PERFECT THE BUSINESS CARD TWO-STEP Give and receive cards face up, with both hands. It’s a mark of respect. Once received, place cards in a visible place—a spot that has the added bonus of being glanceable if you find yourself searching for names.

KNOW YOUR PLACE Most formal occasions will involve meeting in a U-shaped or circular format. The most important guests will take their place next to each other, with others seated in descending rank from there. Take your cues from those seating you—and don’t decline an important seat if it’s offered. In a less formal setting, offer—perhaps even tussle—to pay the bill, but always let the host pay.

EAT LIKE A LOCAL Eating is one of the singular highlights of commerce in a place that reveres food. Beyond the simple necessities—use chopsticks, don’t hassle for silverware—cultivate a taste for new flavours. Let your hosts order, since menus can be long, and the least familiar dishes have a habit of being the tastiest. At tables with a lazy Susan, take small portions when they arrive in front of you. Follow your senior-most host’s lead on when to begin eating. And don’t be afraid to slurp the noodles.

BELLY UP TO BAIJIU While wine is far from a foreign concept in China today, many formal dinners still include baijiu—and sometimes, depending on the host, in large quantities. The clear liquor may be an acquired taste, but a good baijiu (pronounced BY-joe) is every bit as smooth as a good whisky, and it rewards those willing to raise a glass with their hosts. To prepare for a baijiu-fuelled banquet, settle on some bon mots or even a song as a reciprocal toast—such tributes will typically be lengthier and more flowery than a simple “cheers.” Flattery is a universal language, and a bit of baijiu stamina never hurt as a show of business bravura.

FIND COMMON GROUND Did your second cousin twice removed study in Shanghai? Did you recently watch The Wandering Earth? There is a rich history of foreigners calling on tenuous connections in China (Canada’s Conservatives never shied away from name-dropping Norman Bethune, an ideological communist who happened to be a Canadian in Mao’s good books). There’s good reason to do so: The Pacific is vast, and bridges bring people together.

COMMIT TO THE LONG-TERM In China, where courts are unreliable, relationships, not contracts, tend to be the glue that binds. Keep expectations modest for an initial meeting. Return trips show commitment and respect.

POLITICS AND PROFIT AREN’T FAR APART Chinese leaders like to vaunt their support for private industry, and state-owned enterprises make up only a small segment of the commercial sphere. But in China, everything is political, and the line between private and public less distinct. Make a point of meeting, and returning to see, local functionaries. But with business counterparts, politics is a minefield you’re not likely to navigate successfully.

EMBA Programs

British Columbia

Simon Fraser University’s Beedie School of Business

Vancouver

Tuition: $56,100

Number of students accepted: 40

Average work experience: 19.5 years

Male-female ratio: 67-33

Duration: 20 months

Go here if you want to be a better team player. Beedie offers small classes where first-year students work together in teams to simulate executive roles.

Experience counts Students in both of Beedie’s EMBA programs have the most work experience of any Canadian program—19 years on average.

By the board New courses focus on reporting to or sitting on a board of directors, as well as on corporate responsibility, including an organization’s social, ecological and economic duties.

Pack your bags Students who opt for the second-year Americas EMBA stream attend four nine-day sessions at SFU, Vanderbilt University (Nashville), ITAM (Mexico City) and FIA (São Paulo).

Simon Fraser University’s Beedie School of Business (EMBA in Indigenous Business and Leadership)

Vancouver

Tuition: $56,000

Number of students accepted: Up to 40

Average work experience: 19 years

Male-female ratio: 36-54

Duration: 20 months

Go here if you’re interested in Indigenous business management, economic development, nation building and self-determination (with guest lecturers including former national chief Phil Fontaine and former prime minister Paul Martin). This is the only accredited program in North America that respects and incorporates Indigenous traditional knowledge, cultural protocols and history.

Inside track The Indigenous Business & Communities course explores issues related to businesses operating in the traditional territories of First Nations or other Indigenous peoples.

Alberta

University of Alberta

Edmonton

Tuition: $67,000

Number of students accepted: 30

Average work experience: 17.2 years

Male-female ratio: 73-27

Duration: 22 months

Go here if you want to build a strong personal network—students have access to the Alberta School of Business’s Executive Coaching program, designed to drive individual growth.

Business ties For their capstone project, students work on a strategic business issue for their own employer.

Diverse cohort In 2018, three-quarters of students arrived with a non-business background; more than 60% had science or engineering qualifications.

Pack your bags Year two concludes with a two-week trip to China to visit local, Canadian and international companies.

University of Calgary, Haskayne School of Business

Calgary

Tuition: $75,000

Number of students accepted: 38

Average work experience: 13.5 years

Male-female ratio: 59-41

Duration: 22 months

Go here if you see yourself as an emerging leader. Haskayne’s focus on entrepreneurial thinking is embedded in core courses and the capstone project. Students can tap into speakers and events offered by U of A’s Hunter Centre for Entrepreneurship and Innovation.

Think global Haskayne uses international travel to teach about Calgary-based companies and case studies. Previous cohorts visited the Cosmo Oil Sakai refinery in Japan and the Hong Kong Stock Exchange.

Leaders wanted Haskayne offers leadership workshops in conjunction with the Canadian Centre for Advanced Leadership in Business, and participants can pick the brains of executives like former WestJet CEO Gregg Saretsky during in-class sessions.

Specializations Finance and general management.

Ontario

McMaster University, DeGroote School of Business (EMBA in Digital Transformation)

Burlington, Ont., and Palo Alto, Calif.

Tuition: $89,000

Number of students accepted: 30

Average work experience: 18 years

Male-female ratio: 67-33

Duration: 14 months

Go here if you manage digital systems. This world-first program focuses on making data-driven decisions, and leadership and recruitment in digital environments.

Pack your bags In 2019, the Silicon Valley residency included site visits, tours and meetings with leaders from companies such as Apple, Macromedia, Kaiser Permanente, Relay Ventures and Ideo.

Partnership alert DeGroote’s partner network—led by theScore, CIBC, IBM, Rogers and SAS—provides access to case studies, capstone projects, guest speakers and site visits.

Let’s get digital The program connects students with McMaster’s Digital Transformation Research Centre and the MacDATA Big Data Institute.

Queen’s University, Smith School of Business (National EMBA)

Kingston and other cities

$102,000 | 78 | 14 years | 56-44 | 16 months

Kingston, Ont., and other cities

Tuition: $102,000

Number of students accepted: 78

Average work experience: 14 years

Male-female ratio: 56-44

Duration: 16 months

Go here if you’re looking for a top-tier EMBA program available anywhere in Canada; students can attend classes in major cities across the country or virtually from home.

Double down Students can work toward a concurrent Project Management Professional designation.

International option If you meet Queen’s tech and timing requirements, you can take the program from various North and South American countries.

Queen’s University / Cornell University, Smith School of Business / Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management (Cornell-Queen’s EMBA Americas)

Kingston and Ithaca, New York

$139,865 | 148 | 12 years | 76-24 | 17 months

Kingston, Ont., and Ithaca, N.Y.

Tuition: $139,865

Number of students accepted: 148

Average work experience: 12 years

Male-female ratio: 76-24

Duration: 17 months

Go here if you want two degrees, including one from an Ivy League institution known as one of the world’s best business schools.

Pack your bags Offered in more than 20 Canadian, U.S. and Latin American locales, the global business project takes students to a destination of their choice to work on a real business issue or opportunity.

Global rolodex Since team-centred classes are shared by Canadian, American and Latin American participants, you’ll stack your network with an international array of execs.

University of Ottawa, Telfer School of Management

Ottawa

Tuition: $75,000

Number of students accepted: 36

Average work experience: 16 years

Male-female ratio: 61-39

Duration: 21 months

Go here if you value hands-on learning—students solve real challenges for clients in various industry settings.

Making connections For its Signature Series of Six Business Consulting Projects, students work with one of 60 client organizations. Candidates can also begin working on a Project Management Professional designation.

Pack your bags Business consulting projects include two trips that leverage the Telfer faculty’s network to secure connections and meetings. Last year’s class went to Silicon Valley and Malaysia.

Get entrepreneurial The School your Startup program links students with emerging companies to create business plans and investor packages, and to pitch a panel of investors.

Accolades Last year, Financial Times ranked Telfer as one of the 100 best EMBAs in the world.

University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management

Toronto

$113,775 | 58 | 15 years | 60-40 | 13 months

Toronto

Tuition: $113,775

Number of students accepted: 58

Average work experience: 15 years

Male-female ratio: 60-40

Duration: 13 months

Go here if you want to become a better leader. Rotman’s Leadership Development Practicum offers personal assessment, one-on-one coaching, and a plan to create emotionally intelligent and effective leaders.

Fast finish At 13 months, Rotman’s EMBA is the shortest program in Canada.

Get entrepreneurial A new capstone project offers students a comprehensive overview of the venture-creation process, while paired with experienced investors.

Accolades It’s the top-ranked Canadian EMBA program, according to Financial Times’ 2018 list.

University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management (Global EMBA)

Toronto and Milan

US$100,000 | 30 | 12 years | 60-40 | 18 months

Toronto and Milan

Tuition: US$100,000

Number of students accepted: 30

Average work experience: 12 years

Male-female ratio: 60-40

Duration: 18 months

Go here if you’re looking to develop expertise and contacts in global markets. Students learn in the “home” hubs of Toronto and Milan (thanks to a new partnership with the SDA Bocconi School of Management), and travel to Mumbai, San Francisco, Copenhagen, Shanghai and São Paulo to study topics ranging from global negotiations to mergers and acquisitions.

Double down Graduates receive degrees from both Rotman and SDA Bocconi.

University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management (Global EMBA for Healthcare and the Life Sciences)

Toronto

$113,775 | 40 | 16 years | 50-50 | 18 months

Toronto

Tuition: $113,775

Number of students accepted: 40

Average work experience: 16 years

Male-female ratio: 50-50

Duration: 18 months

Go here if you are a health care or life sciences provider, scientist, regulatory professional or supplier. This program gives students hands-on experience in three key health care clusters: Toronto, San Francisco and Singapore.

Best in class Each module involves on-site experiences with innovative health care and life sciences organizations.

Lab partners Students in the nine-month Creative Destruction Lab program help mentor seed-stage companies with support from entrepreneurs and leading technologists.

Western University, Ivey Business School

Toronto

Tuition: $115,000

Number of students accepted: 118

Average work experience: 15 years

Male-female ratio: 68-32

Duration: 15 months

Go here if you like hands-on learning: Ivey’s program is case-based, where students dive into issues, make and defend decisions, and take real action.

Pack your bags Students get a crash course in international business during a one-week trip to China, India or Vietnam. Students in the sustainability course travel to Mexico City to attend IPADE University’s International Week conference, with a focus on entrepreneurial solutions to poverty.

CEO factory Alumni include Linamar CEO Linda Hasenfratz (1997), outgoing TD Ameritrade CEO Tim Hockey (1997) and former HBC vice-chair Bonnie Brooks (2008).

York University / Northwestern University, Schulich School of Business / Kellogg School of Management (Kellogg-Schulich EMBA)

Toronto and Chicago

Tuition: $125,000

Number of students accepted: 45

Average work experience: 15 years

Male-female ratio: 70-30

Duration: 18 months

Go here if you want to expand your global reach—students get the chance to meet and study alongside close to 500 leaders from around the world.

Pack your bags This two-in-one program includes a 10-day stay at Kellogg’s EMBA campus in Chicago and the opportunity to study at Kellogg’s Miami campus, as well as at partner schools in Germany, Israel China and Hong Kong.

Brexit boon The Strategies for Growth course is taught in London, U.K., and examines how companies can scale their businesses in the face of Brexit.

Quebec

Concordia University, John Molson School of Business

Montreal

Tuition: $75,000

Number of students accepted: 20

Average work experience: 15 years

Male-female ratio: 85-15

Duration: 20 months

Go here if you want work-life balance: Molson features a family-friendly, one-day-a-week schedule and a Healthy Executive module that encourages a balanced lifestyle within a high-performance work culture.

Pack your bags During the past three years, students have travelled to California, Colombia, Chile, Hong Kong and China to meet business leaders and tour facilities.

Class champion Each cohort is assigned a respected business leader who remains in contact throughout the program. Molson Coors chair Andrew Molson is a former champion.

McGill University/HEC Montréal, Desautels Faculty of Management

Montreal

Tuition: $89,000

Number of students accepted: 47

Average work experience: 18 years

Male-female ratio: 51-49

Duration: 15 months

Go here if you’re looking for diversity; students aren’t typically sponsored by their employers and have diverse backgrounds, from special forces colonels to Indigenous leaders.

Parlez-vous francais? This bilingual program emphasizes the high professional standing of its participants and is structured around research from Desautels management guru Henry Mintzberg.

Gender parity In 2018, 23 women and 23 men graduated—a rarity among EMBA programs.

Execs wanted More than 50% of students are vice-president or above, and one-quarter are president, CEO or general manager.

Université de Sherbrooke

Longueuil

Tuition: $49,200

Number of students accepted: 20

Average work experience: 10-15 years

Male-female ratio: 60-40

Duration: 18 months

Go here if you’re looking for a competency-based approach to learning—instead of standardized courses, participants receive a customized curriculum focused on developing the skills they need for their specific role. Individuals also receive a psychometric evaluation and personal development plan.

Pack your bags The program is also offered in Martinique, in partnership with the Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

Université du Québec à Montréal

Montreal

Tuition: $8,400+

Number of students accepted: 110

Average work experience: 9 years

Male-female ratio: 60-40

Duration: 24 months

Go here if you want to meld work and school—students undertake case studies and can apply their EMBA work to a real project in their own organization.

Frosh days A new two-day seminar helps incoming students get to know one another, and offers a refresher on concepts like team management and leadership.

Triple threat The case-based program is offered in English, French and Spanish.

Pack your bags UQAM’s program is offered in partnership with universities in 11 nations, including France’s Université Paris-Dauphine and China University of Mining and Technology.

Get entrepreneurial Students can take courses in innovation and entrepreneurship in partnership with its engineering school.

Université Laval

Quebec City

Tuition: $19,500

Number of students accepted: 29

Average work experience: 18 years

Male-female ratio: 72-28

Duration: 18 months

Go here if you value flexibility and work-life balance. Laval’s hybrid format features two days of class time and two online classes per month. Students spend just 45 days in class during the entire program.

Pack your bags Students spend a week at Babson College near Boston, ranked No. 1 in the U.S. for entrepreneurship. The 10th anniversary of the program features a trade mission to Mexico.

Career advice Laval offers alumni two personal-development coaching sessions and a 360-degree psychometric assessment.

Atlantic Canada

Saint Mary’s University, Sobey School of Busines

Halifax

Tuition: $52,000

Number of students accepted: 13

Average work experience: 11 years

Male-female ratio: 70-30

Duration: 16 months

Go here if you want a reimagined EMBA focused on future skills—in 2020, Sobey will deliver its program in a hybrid online/in-person format, but with the same focus on evidence-based management.

Pack your bags Last year, students went to Belgium and Denmark on an international trade mission.

Local focus The pan-university Change Lab Action Research Centre is designed to support Nova Scotia communities to address social and economic challenges.

Accolades Sobey’s program was ranked eighth in the world for sustainability by the 2018 Corporate Knights Better World MBA ranking.

University of Prince Edward Island

Charlottetown

Tuition: $34,670

Number of students accepted: 12

Average work experience: 12 years

Male-female ratio: 65-35

Duration: 20 months

Go here if you’re interested in learning how to leverage research findings to make more informed decisions—the program is a pioneer in evidence-based management.

Niches Innovative management, biotechnology management and entrepreneurship.

Get intimate UPEI features the smallest class of any Canadian EMBA program, with just 12 students in their last intake.

What to expect Students take four courses at once, spending nine hours per course per week, plus another 15 to 20 hours for course and team work.

Online

Athabasca University

Tuition: $27,267+

Number of students accepted: 205

Average work experience: 9 years

Male-female ratio: 45-55

Duration: 19+ months

Go here if you want flexibility. Athabasca’s 24-hour online program has been around since 1994 and allows students to set their study hours, with one mandatory in-residence course that can be completed at sites across Canada or internationally.

Goodbye, GMAT Solid management experience is a key criteria for admissions—no GMAT scores required.

Accelerated program CPAs and SCMPs can earn transfer credits, and if you’ve done a business undergrad in the past decade (with a GPA of 3.0 or higher), you could qualify for an accelerated program.

Score! Not only was Athabasca the first online EMBA in the world, but it’s the only one to offer a major in hockey management.

University of Fredericton, Sandermoen School of Business

Tuition: $29,500

Number of students accepted: 178

Average work experience: 16 years

Male-female ratio: 56-44

Duration: 30 months

Go here if you want maximum flexibility and choice: Students can choose from six start dates per year, and the program is 100% online.

Pack your bags The global capstone program features a nine-day session in an international location.

Specializations Sandermoen’s program features eight specialty areas, including social enterprise, health and safety, and real estate leadership. This year, it’s launching a specialization in sales management, focusing on consultative selling, leadership strategy and sales-force design.

MBA Programs

British Columbia

Royal Roads University

Victoria and online

Tuition: $42,680

Number of students accepted: 95

Average work experience: 10 years

Male-female ratio: 59-41

Duration: 18-31 months

Go here if you’re a full-time manager looking for a blend of online and on-campus learning. Royal Roads offers flexible admission, which is open to professionals with at least 10 years of relevant working experience.

Simon Fraser University, Beedie School of Business

Vancouver

Tuition: $40,500

Number of students accepted: 50 (full-time), 50 (part-time), 40 (management of technology MBA)

Average work experience: 5 years FT, 12 years PT, 11 years MOT

Male-female ratio: 50-50 FT, 60-40 PT, 70-30 MOT

Duration: 16 months FT, 24 months PT and MOT

Employment after graduation: 96%

Go here if you want a personalized experience. Beedie’s programs follow a cohort model, where small classes move through the entire program together, taking the same courses, working in teams and developing close networks that last.

Thompson Rivers University

Kamloops and online

Tuition: $22,302

Number of students accepted: 34 (full-time), 57 (part-time)

Average work experience: n/a

Male-female ratio: 51-49

Duration: n/a

Go here if you want maximum flexibility. TRU’s cutomizable MBA is designed to meet the needs of students from all academic backgrounds. Students can complete the program on campus or online, part-time or full-time.

Trinity Western University

Langley and Richmond, B.C.; and Tianjin, Shanghai and Beijing, China

Tuition: $36,225

Number of students accepted: 162 (B.C.), 120 (China)

Average work experience: n/a

Male-female ratio: 58-42

Duration: 14-22 months

Go here if you’re seeking the only Christian MBA program in Canada. The program offers three specializations: management of the growing enterprise, non-profit and charitable organization management, and international business.

University of British Columbia, Sauder School of Business

Vancouver

Tuition: $49,419

Number of students accepted: 97

Average work experience: 6 years

Male-female ratio: 58-42 (full-time)

Duration: 16 months

Employment after graduation: 81%

Go here if you want to go global. Students gain international consulting experience via the mandatory Global Immersion Experience.

University of Northern British Columbia

Vancouver and Prince George, B.C.

Tuition: $6,850

Number of students accepted: 70

Average work experience: 10 years

Male-female ratio: 53-47

Duration: 21 months

Go here if you need to work while you learn—with two locations, you have plenty of flexibility. The program allows you to specialize in an industry and business area that solves a real-world business problem.

University of Victoria, Peter B. Gustavson School of Business

Victoria

Tuition: $34,787

Number of students accepted: 45 (full-time), 25 (part-time)

Average work experience: 5.3 years

Male-female ratio: 70-30

Duration: 16 months FT, 24 months PT

Employment after graduation: 89% within 3 months

Go here if you care about the planet. The UVic MBA in sustainable innovation is for change-makers committed to making a long-lasting impact.

Alberta

University of Alberta, Alberta School of Business

Edmonton

Tuition: $28,438

Number of students accepted: 60 (full-time), 60 (part-time)

Average work experience: 4.5 years

Male-female ratio: 61-39 FT, 62-38 PT

Duration: 20 months FT, 44 months PT

Employment after graduation: 84% within 3 months

Go here if you want individual support from career coaches, along with first-hand learning opportunities, and experience with outside organizations and partners.

University of Alberta

Fort McMurray

Tuition: $45,000

Number of students accepted: 25

Average work experience: 4.5 years

Male-female ratio: 68-32

Duration: 36 months

Employment after graduation: 84% within 3 months

Go here if you’re looking for a global experience anchored in Alberta. With half of the class hailing from abroad and faculty from around the world, Alberta MBA classes have an international perspective.

University of Calgary, Haskayne School of Business

Calgary

Tuition: $32,462

Number of students accepted: 110 (full-time), 53 (evening part-time)

Average work experience: 7 years

Male-female ratio: 65-35 FT, 72-28 PT, 55-45 (accelerated)

Duration: 20 months

Go here if you’re looking to specialize. Haskayne offers six unique specialized degrees: entrepreneurship and innovation; finance; global energy management and sustainable development; marketing; project management; and real estate studies.

Saskatchewan

University of Saskatchewan, Edwards School of Business

Saskatoon

Tuition: $30,306

Number of students accepted: 50

Average work experience: 6 years

Male-female ratio: 56-44

Duration: 12-36 months

Employment after graduation: 92.9%

Go here if you want a transformational experience. The Edwards MBA provides students with the people skills of management, such as how to manage, how to communicate effectively and how to lead. Students participate in a one-week intensive management-skills retreat in northern Saskatchewan.

Manitoba

University of Manitoba, Asper School of Business

Winnipeg

Tuition: $34,000

Number of students accepted: 59

Average work experience: 5 years

Male-female ratio: 77-23

Duration: 12-24 months (full-time), up to 72 months (part-time)

Employment after graduation: 83% after 3 months

Go here if you want a customized MBA. Students can tailor their electives to their specific interests, selecting from specialty areas with high market demand.

Ontario

Brock University, Goodman School of Business

St. Catharines, Ont.

Tuition: $12,070

Number of students accepted: 101 (full-time), 21 (part-time)

Average work experience: 2.75 years

Male-female ratio: n/a

Duration: 1-2 years FT, 4 years PT

Employment after graduation: 90% or higher

Go here if you want to customize your MBA to meet your career goals. What’s new this year: international double-degree opportunities where students can complete an MBA with Goodman and a second master’s degree at an international partner school.

Carleton University, Sprott School of Business

Ottawa

Tuition: $31,118

Number of students accepted: 57

Average work experience: 3.9 years

Male-female ratio: 63-37

Duration: 16 months

Employment after graduation: 94% within 12 months

Go here if you want to make a difference in a changing world. Students benefit from a world-class, collaborative learning environment built on case studies, interactive simulation and real-time, client-based projects. Internships are available.

Lakehead University

Thunder Bay, Ont.

Tuition: $18,557-$23,505

Number of students accepted: 60

Average work experience: 3 years

Male-female ratio: 41-59

Duration: 12-16 months

Go here if you want a general MBA to prepare for a wide range of management roles. The student-centred program helps students develop analytical, decision-making and communication skills, as well as ethical considerations.

Laurentian University

Sudbury and online

Tuition: $13,000

Number of students accepted: 20

Average work experience: 13 years

Male-female ratio: 45-55

Duration: 11+ months

Employment after graduation: 90% within 6 months

Go here if you’re looking for flexibility. Students can complete their MBA online, on-campus or a combination of the two, building on a core business foundation.

McMaster University, DeGroote School of Business

Burlington, Ont.

Tuition: $18,500-$41,500

Number of students accepted: 250

Average work experience: 2.5 years (full-time), 8 years (part-time)

Male-female ratio: 56-44

Duration: 8-36 months

Employment after graduation: 97%

Go here if you want choice. DeGroote offers four programs, including a new blended-learning part-time MBA and the MBA with Co-op. With over 200 employer partnerships and 8,000 alumni globally, students can build and strengthen their network throughout their career.

Queen’s University, Smith School of Business

Kingston

Tuition: $83,000

Number of students accepted: 80

Average work experience: 4.2 years

Male-female ratio: 63-37

Duration: 12 months

Employment after graduation: 97% within 3 months

Go here if you like working as part of a team, with members scattered across numerous countries and time zones. The Smith MBA offers valuable leadership skills through its team-based model, project-based courses and problem-based learning.

Royal Military College of Canada

Online

Tuition: $12,770

Number of students accepted: 48

Average work experience: 5-10 years

Male-female ratio: 77-23

Duration: 12 months (full-time), 2-5 years (part-time)

Employment after graduation: 99%

Go here if you want a program in a variety of subject areas combining military, government and commercial viewpoints. Faculty members are industry leaders and experts in their field, with both professional experience and academic achievement.

Ryerson University, Ted Rogers School of Management

Toronto

Tuition: $22,328

Number of students accepted: 65 (full-time), 65 (part-time)

Average work experience: 5 years

Male-female ratio: 66-34

Duration: 12 months FT, 24 months PT

Employment after graduation: 90% within 6 months

Go here if you like smaller class sizes to support more meaningful collaboration with peers, faculty and business experts. Executive coaches provide customized career counselling. The program keeps up with emerging trends and evolving marketplace demands through electives such as sports media and social media analytics.

University of Guelph

Guelph and online

Tuition: $40,607

Number of students accepted: 45

Average work experience: 10 years

Male-female ratio: n/a

Duration: 24 months

Go here if you’re a mid-career professional who wants to specialize in hospitality and tourism, food and agribusiness, or sustainable commerce.

University of Ottawa, Telfer School of Management

Ottawa

Tuition: $65,000

Number of students accepted: 25-30

Average work experience: 15 years

Male-female ratio: 65-35

Duration: 12-24 months

Go here if you aspire to lead. Telfer’s MBA equips professionals with the competencies essential for high-performing managers to deliver in the infrastructure, IT, health, defence, financial and business transformation sectors—all in a G7 capital with a world-class tech hub.

University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management

Toronto

Tuition: $92,500

Number of students accepted: 300

Average work experience: 4.6 years

Male-female ratio: 64-36

Duration: 20 months

Employment after graduation: 85% within 3 months

Go here if you’re committed to personal development. Apart from hard analytic skills, students develop empathy, self-awareness and the ability to motivate others into action through initiatives such as the Self-Development Lab and Leadership Development Lab.

University of Windsor, Odette School of Business

Windsor

Tuition: $25,000

Number of students accepted: 50 (full-time), 25 (part-time)

Average work experience: 2-5 years

Male-female ratio: 44-56

Duration: 14 months

Employment after graduation: 95%

Go here if you want to work beside leaders from corporate partners like Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment, Avis and Crayola. Odette integrates real-world projects and personalized instruction through its Advanced Program for Experiential Consulting program. Students with no business background are welcome.

Western University, Ivey Business School

London

Tuition: $83,250

Number of students accepted: 154

Average work experience: 5 years

Male-female ratio: 67-33

Duration: 12 months

Employment after graduation: 96% within 6 months

Go here if you want an intense curriculum to reach your career goals fast. Ivey’s case-based experience immerses students in an action-oriented learning environment, with real-world cases and business issues. It’s a powerful learning approach with a global perspective.

Wilfrid Laurier University, Lazaridis School of Business

Waterloo, Toronto

Tuition: $33,534

Number of students accepted: 80 (full-time Waterloo), 60 (part-time Waterloo), 80 (part-time Toronto)

Average work experience: 2-5 years (Waterloo), 6-10 years (Toronto)

Male-female ratio: 56-44

Duration: 12 months FT, 3.3 years PT

Employment after graduation: 93% within 12 months

Go here if you like choice. The Lazaridis MBA offers 10 specializations, including entrepreneurship. It all starts with an integrated core curriculum that incorporates the eight foundational areas of business along with real-life case studies, lively discussions, collaboration and teamwork.

York University, Schulich School of Business

Toronto

Tuition: $70,075

Number of students accepted: n/a

Average work experience: 5 years

Male-female ratio: 62-38

Duration: 16 months

Employment after graduation: 90% within 3 months

Go here if you think globally. Schulich is known for its focus on international business, with campuses in Beijing and Hyderabad, India, and more than 80 exchange partners worldwide. First-of-their-kind degrees include a master’s in real estate and infrastructure, and a master’s in AI.

Quebec

Concordia University, John Molson School of Business

Montreal

Tuition: $6,000-$14,000 (full-time)

Number of students accepted: 120 (full-time)

Average work experience: 5.5 years

Male-female ratio: 60-40

Duration: 24 months FT, 36-48 months PT

Employment after graduation: 97%

Go here if you want smaller classes with a case-focused curriculum and hands on-learning. Flexible elective options include beyond-the-classroom opportunities in international exchange, co-op placements and the MBA International Case Competition.

HEC Montréal

Montreal

Tuition: $8,400-$18,100

Number of students accepted: 260

Average work experience: 6-7 years

Male-female ratio: n/a

Duration: 1 year (full-time), 2 years (part-time)

Employment after graduation: 91%

Go here if you’re looking for a career-changing program in a bilingual setting. With its international scope, general management focus and emphasis on experiential learning, HEC Montréal’s program trains reflective and responsible professionals, and puts them in control over their personal development.

McGill University, Desautels Faculty of Management

Montreal

Tuition: $79,500

Number of students accepted: 125 (full-time), 25 (part-time)

Average work experience: 5.5 years

Male-female ratio: 62-38

Duration: 12-20 months FT, 28 months PT

Employment after graduation: 90% within 3 months

Go here if you want to cultivate a wide network—McGill’s MBA alumni network spans 150+ countries—and study in both of Canada’s official languages, with multiple program options.

Université de Sherbrooke

Sherbrooke

Tuition: $23,850-$62,700

Number of students accepted: 60 (full-time), 60 (part-time)

Average work experience: 7 years

Male-female ratio: 50-50

Duration: 16 months FT, 2.5-5 years PT

Employment after graduation: 100%

Go here if you want a practical, hands-on education. Students need to deliver a real-life strategic mandate by the end of the program. Full-time students also do a four-month, career-related paid internship to build their skills.

Université du Québec à Montréal (MBA conseil en management)

Montreal

Tuition: $8,400-$18,720

Number of students accepted: 50 (two intakes a year)

Average work experience: 4 years

Male-female ratio: 45-55

Duration: 24 months

Go here if you’re a working professional focused on management consulting. Eligible graduates of this part-time program can benefit from an accelerated process to obtain the title of Certified Management Consultant.

Université du Québec à Montréal (MBA sciences comptables)

Montreal

Tuition: $8,400-$18,720

Number of students accepted: 50 (two intakes a year)

Average work experience: n/a

Male-female ratio: 59-41

Duration: 24-48 months

Go here if you’ve completed your DESS in Accounting Practice (CPA), DESS in Accounting Science or CPA Professional Education Program—you can get credits toward your MBA. The program allows students to deepen their theoretical and applied knowledge in accounting.

Université du Québec à Montréal (MBA sciences et génie)

Montreal

Tuition: $8,400-$18,720

Number of students accepted: 50 (two intakes a year)

Average work experience: 3 years

Male-female ratio: 75-25

Duration: 24 months

Go here if you’re a STEM graduate. This is the only MBA offered in Quebec for students who’ve completed their undergrad exclusively in sciences and engineering, and have less than three years of work experience.

Université Laval

Quebec City and online

Tuition: $5,200- $13,500

Number of students accepted: no limit

Average work experience: 3 years

Male-female ratio: 58-42

Duration: 20 months

Employment after graduation: 94%

Go here if you’re looking for flexibility. ULaval offers 21 specializations, six of which can be followed entirely online. For the others, Laval offers a mix of in-class, online or hybrid classes to accommodate students’ varied schedules.

Atlantic Canada

Cape Breton University, Shannon School of Business

Sydney, NS (full-time), Toronto, Kingston, Edmonton, Calgary, Saskatoon, and Brandon (weekend program)

Tuition: $24,736

Number of students accepted: 410 (full-time), 80 (part-time)

Average work experience: 5 years

Male-female ratio: 45-55

Duration: 12-24 months

Go here if you want to change the neighbourhood or the world. This is North America’s only MBA in Community Economic Development, preparing students for all three sectors of the economy: business, government and community.

Dalhousie University, Rowe School of Business

Halifax

Tuition: $52,593

Number of students accepted: 44 (full-time), 95 (part-time)

Average work experience: 2 years

Male-female ratio: 50-50 FT, 53-47 PT

Duration: 22 months FT, 36-48 months PT

Employment after graduation: 98%

Go here if you’re young and come from a non-business background. Students gain corporate work experience through an eight-month paid residency. Alternatively, the online/blended model provides mid-career professionals the flexibility to study from anywhere.

Memorial University

St. John’s

Tuition: $5,718–$9,666

Number of students accepted: 44

Average work experience: 6.2 years

Male-female ratio: 58-42

Duration: 2 years

Go here if you care about how business behaves. Memorial is on the leading edge of business and management education—it’s the first MBA with mandatory training in business ethics and the first in Atlantic Canada to be AACSB-accredited.

Saint Mary’s University, Sobey School of Business

Halifax

Tuition: $29,546

Number of students accepted: 42

Average work experience: 5-6 years

Male-female ratio: 50-50

Duration: 2 years

Employment after graduation: 100%

Go here if you want to push your boundaries. From the introductory leadership retreat to a mandatory international study trip to working with community organizations, students are challenged to apply their education.

University of Fredericton, Sandermoen School of Business

Online

Tuition: $24,500

Number of students accepted: 174

Average work experience: 10 years

Male-female ratio: 54-46

Duration: 42 months (accelerated option: 21 months)

Employment after graduation: 98%

Go here if you want options. Sandermoen offers eight leadership specializations, including a new stream in sales management and leadership.

University of New Brunswick, Fredericton

Tuition: $22,338

Number of students accepted: 30 (full-time), 10 (part-time)

Average work experience: 6 years

Male-female ratio: n/a

Duration: 16-20 months FT, up to five years PT

Go here if you want to apply theory to real business challenges in specialized programs, course work and competitions. The program focuses on experiential learning and thinking, combined with small classes, award-winning professors, robust industry partnerships and professional development.

University of New Brunswick, Saint John

Tuition: $22,005

Number of students accepted: 70-80 (full-time), 20-40 (part-time)

Average work experience: 7 years

Male-female ratio: n/a

Duration: 12 months

Employment after graduation: 95% within 12 months

Go here if you want a global classroom with intimate access to business leaders, including one-on-one mentorship. The first in Canada to offer professional sales and project management, the program includes a nine-week consulting project with a local company or organization.

University of Prince Edward Island (MBA in Global Leadership)

Charlottetown

Tuition: $20,000

Number of students accepted: 40

Average work experience: n/a

Male-female ratio: n/a

Duration: 12 months

Go here if you want a global career. UPEI’s MBA is designed to enhance the skill sets and decision-making abilities needed in today’s international business environment. The program also focuses on evidence-based leadership practices.

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