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In the wake of the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, and with the ongoing war in Yemen, activists are pushing the West to cut off weapons exports to Saudi Arabia, the world’s second-largest arms importer. But though the kingdom no longer wields near-unilateral control over global oil prices, its crude still accounts for 12.7% of global consumption. Cut off the weapons and you could jeopardize oil supply or destablize prices.

Total volume of arms exports

by country, and the percentage

bound for Saudi Arabia

In so-called trade indicator value units,

a measure of volume, from 2013–2017

United States

50 Billion total

18%

goes to

Saudi Arabia

United Kingdom

7 Billion

Switzerland

20%

Spain

49%

1.3 Billion

4.3 Billion

Sweden

Turkey

8.3%

13%

16%

1.3 Billion

1.2 Billion

Canada

19%

1.1 Billion

Saudi Arabia’s

main suppliers

from 2013–2017

448%

Increase in U.S. arms

exports to Saudi Arabia

from 2008–12

to 2013–17

61%

U.S.

23%

U.K.

$69.4

BIllion

3.6%

France

Saudi Arabia’s

total military

spending in 2017

12.4%

Other

Countries no longer selling

arms to Saudi Arabia

canada

12%

Finland

Germany

Sweden

Norway

u.S.

9%

% of oil imported from Saudi Arabia

0.9%

0.5%

0%

0%

World’s largest arms dealers by sales (in U.S. $)

Lockheed Martin (U.S.)

$40.8 billion

Boeing (U.S.)

$29.5 billion

Raytheon (U.S.)

$22.9 billion

BAE Systems (U.K.)

$22.8 billion

Northrop Grumman (U.S.)

$21.4 billion

General Dynamics (U.S.)

$19.2 billion

If they don’t buy it from us, they’re

going to buy it from Russia or they’re

going to buy it from China, or they’re

going to buy it from other countries.

—President Donald Trump on

why the U.S. won’t stop selling

arms to Saudi Arabia over the

murder of Jamal Khashoggi

We do not need your armaments.

We will find them some-where else.

—Saudi Arabia’s foreign minister,

Adel al-Jubeir, responding to

Germany’s decision to cut off

arms sales to countries involved

in the war in Yemen

Total volume of arms exports by country,

and the percentage bound for Saudi Arabia

In so-called trade indicator value units, a measure of volume, from 2013–2017

United States

50 Billion total

18%

goes to

Saudi Arabia

United Kingdom

7 Billion

Switzerland

49%

20%

Spain

1.3 Billion

Sweden

4.3 Billion

Canada

13%

8.3%

19%

1.3 Billion

1.1 Billion

Turkey

16%

1.2 Billion

Saudi Arabia’s

main suppliers

from 2013–2017

61%

U.S.

448%

Increase in U.S. arms

exports to Saudi Arabia from

2008–12 to 2013–17

23%

U.K.

$69.4 BIllion

3.6%

France

12.4%

Other

Saudi Arabia’s total military

spending in 2017

Countries no longer selling

arms to Saudi Arabia

canada

12%

Germany

Sweden

Norway

Finland

u.S.

9%

% of oil imported from Saudi Arabia

0.9%

0.5%

0%

0%

World’s largest arms dealers by sales (in U.S. $)

Lockheed Martin (U.S.)

$40.8 billion

Boeing (U.S.)

$29.5 billion

Raytheon (U.S.)

$22.9 billion

BAE Systems (U.K.)

$22.8 billion

Northrop Grumman (U.S.)

$21.4 billion

General Dynamics (U.S.)

$19.2 billion

If they don’t buy it from us, they’re going to buy

it from Russia or they’re going to buy it from China,

or they’re going to buy it from other countries.

—President Donald Trump on why the U.S.

won’t stop selling arms to Saudi Arabia over

the murder of Jamal Khashoggi

We do not need your armaments.

We will find them some-where else.

—Saudi Arabia’s foreign minister,

Adel al-Jubeir, responding to Germany’s decision to cut off arms sales to countries involved in the war in Yemen

Total volume of arms exports by country,

and the percentage bound for Saudi Arabia

In so-called trade

indicator value

units, a measure

of volume,

from 2013–2017

18%

goes to

Saudi Arabia

49%

United Kingdom

7 Billion

United States

If they don’t

buy it from us,

they’re going

to buy it from

Russia or

they’re going

to buy it from

China, or they’re

going to buy

it from other

countries.

16%

448%

50 Billion total

Turkey

20%

8.3%

Switzerland

Increase in U.S.

arms exports to

Saudi Arabia

from 2008–12

to 2013–17

1.2 Billion

Spain

1.3 Billion

19%

4.3 Billion

Canada

13%

Sweden

$69.4

1.1 Billion

—President

Donald Trump

on why the

U.S. won’t stop

selling arms to

Saudi Arabia over

the murder of

Jamal Khashoggi

1.3 Billion

BIllion

Saudi Arabia’s

total military

spending in 2017

Countries no longer selling

arms to Saudi Arabia

canada

12%

Germany

Sweden

Norway

Finland

u.S.

9%

Saudi Arabia’s

main suppliers

from 2013–2017

% of oil imported from Saudi Arabia

0.9%

0.5%

0%

0%

We do not

need your

armaments.

We will find

them some-

where else.

61%

U.S.

World’s largest arms dealers by sales (in U.S. $)

Lockheed Martin (U.S.)

$40.8 billion

Boeing (U.S.)

—Saudi Arabia’s

foreign minister,

Adel al-Jubeir,

responding to

Germany’s

decision to cut

off arms sales

to countries

involved in the

war in Yemen

23%

U.K.

$29.5 billion

Raytheon (U.S.)

$22.9 billion

BAE Systems (U.K.)

$22.8 billion

3.6%

France

Northrop Grumman (U.S.)

$21.4 billion

12.4%

Other

General Dynamics (U.S.)

$19.2 billion

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