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Shaw to tap Christy Clark’s network as former B.C. premier joins board of directors

Shaw Communications Inc. has named Christy Clark to its board, landing the former British Columbia premier her second high-profile job in a month since leaving politics.

The former leader of the B.C. Liberal Party was hired as a special adviser to the law firm Bennett Jones LLP last month.

Calgary-based Shaw said on Friday the cable and wireless company reported its third-quarter fiscal results on Thursday and the board approved the appointment at a meeting the same day.

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Ms. Clark was premier of B.C. from 2011 to 2017 and, before that, served as a cabinet member for four years under then-premier Gordon Campbell. She also has media experience, having left politics briefly in 2005 to work as a radio host.

“She brings to our board a breadth and depth of relationships across Canada, both from politics and business, particularly in British Columbia, including in our largest single market, the Greater Vancouver area,” JR Shaw, executive chairman and founder of the company, said in a news release.

The company lost a board member when Jim Shaw, JR Shaw’s son and former Shaw chief executive, passed away in early January. Jim Shaw’s younger brother, Brad Shaw, is the company’s current CEO.

Now, with 16 directors again, Shaw’s board is on the big side for large Canadian public companies. Its Western rival, Telus Corp., has 13 directors while BCE Inc., Canada’s largest communications company, has 14. Rogers Communications Inc., which, as with Shaw, is a family-controlled company and has several family members on the board, has 15 directors, while Quebecor Inc., also family-controlled, has just nine.

Directors on Shaw’s board earned between about $240,000 and $385,000 in fees and share-based compensation in 2017. This is similar to what directors are paid at other large Canadian telecoms.

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