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Here are the top reads on deals and financial services over the last week,

FINANCIAL SERVICES NEWS

Canada desperately needs more foreign investment – so why is it not a campaign issue?: Egyptian billionaire Naguib Sawiris has vowed to never again invest in Canada. The telecom mogul, who bankrolled Wind Mobile and then tried and failed to acquire Manitoba Telecom Services Inc.'s Allstream division, regrets ever investing here. In fact, he advises other international financiers not to do so either. Opinion (Rita Trichur)

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Investment companies can’t limit liability with clauses in contracts, IIROC says: Canada’s investment-industry regulator says firms must stop inserting clauses in their contracts with investors that limit their liability for losses – even in cases where the firm’s employees have broken rules and recommended unsuitable investments. Story (David Milstead and Clare O’Hara)

Mutual fund advisers will be required to complete continuing education to keep licence starting 2020: Mutual fund advisers will be required next year to complete continuing education credits in order to keep their licence, putting them on par with other certified professionals in the financial services industry as the sector looks to increase transparency. Story (Clare O’Hara)

Here’s a perfect example of how U.S.-style competition on fees is alien to Canada: While U.S. online brokers slash stock-trading commissions to zero, a lone Canadian broker is adjusting its fees. Story (Rob Carrick)

Tiny commissions, big problem: price war gives TD a headache on its U.S. strategy: A pricing war has rattled the U.S. discount stock brokerage market, putting Toronto-Dominion Bank in a strategic bind as Canada’s second-largest lender mulls ways to mitigate the damage. Story (James Bradshaw)

Aborted LSE takeover by Hong Kong Exchanges shows China’s growing influence: China’s influence, real or perceived, has sure become problematic when it comes to doing business in a world of upheaval. Opinion (Jeffrey Jones)

Activity surges in ‘maple’ bond market as global public-sector entities take advantage of low borrowing costs: Low borrowing costs and strong investor demand have led to a rush of activity in the “maple” bond market, as global public-sector entities tap the Canadian debt market for cash. Story (Alexandra Posadzki)

Canada’s latest real estate IPO targeting a 2 per cent yield, testing investor limits: The latest property owner to attempt an initial public offering is aiming to pay an annual yield around 2 per cent, according to a source familiar with the deal, an uncommonly low rate that illustrates just how popular the market for Canadian apartment buildings has become. Story (Tim Kiladze)

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DEALS NEWS: MERGERS, ACQUISITIONS, IPOs and FINANCINGS

Tourmaline will spin off part of its assets into a new royalty and energy company: Tourmaline Oil Corp. shares jumped 15 per cent on Friday after it said it will spin off some of its assets into a royalty and energy infrastructure company worth $775-million, with the aim of taking it public. Tourmaline will own 75 per cent to 81 per cent of the new entity, called Topaz Energy Corp., and unnamed private investors will own the remainder, paying $150-million to $200-million for their stake. Story (Jeffrey Jones)

Uber to buy Chile’s Cornershop in bid to deliver your groceries: Uber Technologies Inc. said on Friday it would buy a majority stake in online grocery provider Cornershop as the ride-hailing giant moves to expand its fast-growing delivery service into the grocery store market. Santiago-based Cornershop operates in Mexico, Chile, Canada and Peru, but chief executive Oskar Hjertonsson said the deal would allow it to deliver groceries “in many more countries around the world.” Story (Reuters)

Brookfield Business Partners to sell stake in North American Palladium in $1-billion deal with Implats: Canadian palladium miner North American Palladium Ltd. has agreed to sell itself for $1-billion in an unusually structured deal that sees its biggest shareholder, Brookfield Business Partners L.P., accept a discount in order to cash in on a big return amid strong global demand for the metal. Story (David Milstead and Niall McGee)

Back to the boom: Canadian tech sector posts biggest quarter for financing since the dot-com bubble: Canada’s technology sector had one of its strongest showings for venture- and growth-capital financing in the third quarter, as large funds continue to seek bigger investments in private companies. Story (Sean Silcoff)

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

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Hockey, baseball and buzzwords: Can Rogers Media’s new boss solve some old media problems?: When Rogers Communications Inc. hired Jordan Banks as the new president of its media division this summer, it was not just announcing new leadership. It was sending a message. The symbolism was clear. Story (Susan Krashinsky Robertson, Andrew Willis)

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