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Microsoft Corp. is shutting down its main LinkedIn service in China later this year after internet rules were tightened by Beijing, the latest American tech giant to lessen its ties to the country.

The company said in a blog post Thursday it has faced a “significantly more challenging operating environment and greater compliance requirements in China.”

LinkedIn will replace its localized platform in China with a new app called InJobs that has some of LinkedIn’s career-networking features, but “will not include a social feed or the ability to share posts or articles.”

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LinkedIn in March said it would pause new member sign-ups on LinkedIn China because of unspecified regulatory issues. China’s internet watchdog in May said it had found LinkedIn, as well as Microsoft’s Bing search engine and about 100 other apps, were engaged in improper collection and use of data and ordered them to fix the problem.

Several scholars this year also reported getting warning letters from LinkedIn that they were sharing “prohibited content” that would not be made viewable in China but could still be seen by LinkedIn users elsewhere.

Tony Lee, a scholar at Berlin’s Free University, told the Associated Press in June that LinkedIn didn’t tell him which content was prohibited, but said it was tied to the section of his profile where he listed his publications. Among his listed articles was one about the 1989 crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square and another comparing Chinese President Xi Jinping with former leader Mao Zedong.

It’s been more than seven years since LinkedIn launched a site in simplified Chinese, the written characters used on the mainland, to expand its reach in the country. It said at the time of the launch in early 2014 that expanding in China raises “difficult questions” because it will be required to censor content, but that it would be clear about how it conducts business in China and undertake “extensive measures” to protect members’ rights and data.

Microsoft bought LinkedIn in 2016.

“LinkedIn once served a crucial role, as the only social media network on which Chinese and Western colleagues could communicate away from [Chinese Communist Party] censorship and prying eyes,” said Eyck Freymann, another scholar who received a censorship warning letter this year, in a text message Thursday.

Mr. Freymann, a doctoral student in China studies at Oxford University, said it is “shameful that Microsoft spent months censoring its own users – and, worse, pressuring them to self-censor,” but that the company ultimately made the right choice to pull the plug.

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Google pulled its search engine out of mainland China in 2010 after the government began censoring search results and videos on YouTube.

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