Skip to main content
Canada’s most-awarded newsroom for a reason
Enjoy unlimited digital access
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
Canada’s most-awarded newsroom for a reason
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
// //

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission refiled its antitrust case against Facebook Inc on Thursday, accusing it of illegally maintaining monopoly power after the regulator suffered a setback earlier this year when a federal judge threw out its lawsuit against the company.

At 80 pages, the new complaint is significantly longer than the original, 53-page complaint and includes additional data and evidence intended to support the FTC’s contention that Facebook is a monopolist. An expanded portion of the complaint argues that Facebook dominates the U.S. personal social networking market.

The FTC voted 3-2 along party lines to file the amended lawsuit and denied Facebook’s request that agency head Lina Khan be recused. Khan participated in filing the new complaint.

Story continues below advertisement

The FTC accused Facebook of an “illegal buy or bury scheme to crush competition” in the headline of the press release on its complaint.

In a tweet, Facebook said it is reviewing the agency’s amended complaint and will have more to say soon.

The high-profile case represents one of the most significant challenges the agency has brought against a tech company in decades, and is being closely watched as Washington aims to tackle the growing market power of Big Tech companies.

In its new complaint, the agency once again asked the court to order Facebook to sell Instagram, which it bought in 2012 for $1-billion, and WhatsApp, which it bought in 2014 for $19-billion.

It also asked the court to require Facebook to obtain prior approval for acquisitions in the future and to cease all anticompetitive behaviour.

“Despite causing significant customer dissatisfaction, Facebook has enjoyed enormous profits for an extended period of time suggesting both that it has monopoly power and that its personal social networking rivals are not able to overcome entry barriers and challenge its dominance,” the amended complaint said.

The amended complaint comes after Judge James Boasberg of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia said in June that the FTC’s original complaint filed in December failed to provide evidence that Facebook had monopoly power in the social-networking market.

Story continues below advertisement

Facebook shares were little changed at $355.58 in afternoon trading.

Be smart with your money. Get the latest investing insights delivered right to your inbox three times a week, with the Globe Investor newsletter. Sign up today.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error
Tickers mentioned in this story
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies