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A police officer and a service dog walk past blossoming ornamental fruit trees as as COVID-19 restrictions continue in Calgary, Alta., on May 17, 2021.

Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press

The Alberta government detailed a plan Wednesday to reopen businesses, activities and services impacted by public health rules meant to curb the spread of COVID-19. Here are the three stages set out by the province:

Stage 1

This stage is to start Tuesday, two weeks after 50 per cent of Albertans 12 and older received at least one dose of vaccine and COVID-19 hospitalizations went below 800.

  • The limit on outdoor social gatherings increases to 10 people. Indoor social gatherings are still not permitted.
  • Outdoor patio dining at restaurants can resume with a maximum of four people from the same household at the same table. Those who live alone can dine with two close contacts.
  • Retail capacity increases to 15 per cent of fire code occupancy.
  • Personal and wellness services can open by appointment only.
  • Wedding ceremonies can be held with a maximum of 10 people. Receptions remain prohibited.
  • Funeral ceremonies may have up to 20 people. Receptions are still prohibited.
  • Starting this Friday, the capacity for worship services increases to 15 per cent of fire code occupancy.

Stage 2

This phase will begin two weeks after 60 per cent have received a vaccine and hospitalizations are below 500 and trending downward. Premier Jason Kenney says this could happen by mid-June.

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  • The limit on outdoor gatherings increases to 20 people.
  • Wedding ceremonies can be held with up to 20 people. Receptions are permitted outdoors.
  • Funeral receptions are permitted outdoors.
  • Restaurants can open indoor dining with up to six people from any household at a table.
  • Retail capacity increases to one-third of fire code occupancy.
  • Capacity for places of worship also increases to one-third occupancy.
  • Gyms and indoor fitness facilities can open for solo and drop-in activities and fitness classes.
  • Arenas, theatres, museums, art galleries and libraries can open with up to one-third of fire occupancy.
  • Indoor and outdoor youth and adult sports can resume.
  • Youth activities, such as day camps and play centres, can open.
  • Personal and wellness services can provide walk-in services.
  • Postsecondary institutions can resume in-person learning.
  • The work-from-home order is lifted but still recommended.
  • Outdoor fixed-seating facilities, such as grandstands, can open at one-third capacity.
  • The limit on public outdoor gatherings – concerts and festivals – increases to 150 people.
  • Distancing and masking requirements remain in effect.

Stage 3

This step will happen two weeks after 70 per cent have had a shot of vaccine. Kenney says this could be at the beginning of July or earlier.

  • All restrictions are lifted, included masking and a ban on indoor gatherings.
  • Isolation requirements remain in place for confirmed cases of COVID-19 and some protective measures are extended in continuing care settings.

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