Skip to main content

Alberta premier Jason Kenney shakes hands with Nate Glubish, Minister of Service Alberta after being sworn into office, in Edmonton on April 30, 2019.

JASON FRANSON/The Canadian Press

The Alberta government is moving to fire the entire board that regulates the provincial real estate industry on the grounds it is hopelessly dysfunctional and racked by infighting.

Service Alberta Minister Nate Glubish has tabled legislation that will allow the province to dismiss the board and appoint an interim administrator until a new board is in place.

Mr. Glubish says the problems plaguing the Real Estate Council of Alberta have gone on too long and critical work is not being addressed.

Story continues below advertisement

The decision follows an outside audit report on the council commissioned by the government earlier this year.

The report by KPMG says the board has been spending too much time on internal and administrative matters.

It says focus committees have been left empty, meetings have not been held and there’s been a lack of oversight on spending.

“There are too many issues with the current composition and operations of council to enable an effective governance body,” the report says.

“Dismissing only a subset of council could contribute to a further deterioration in trust amongst council, administration and industry.”

Mr. Glubish said immediate action is needed.

“The Real Estate Council of Alberta has failed to provide effective governance and oversight over the real-estate industry,” he told the house Wednesday.

Story continues below advertisement

“Our focus with this bill is to protect the overall operations of the council and its critically important role, and to restore Albertans’ trust in the real estate regulator.”

NDP critic Jon Carson said the plan is good in principle, but it’s critical that qualified people are picked for the new board.

“We’re going to be working very hard to ensure that moving forward, regular Albertans are appointed to this board and that it’s not just used as another opportunity for the [United Conservative Party] to appoint their friends and insiders,” Mr. Carson said.

Our Morning Update and Evening Update newsletters are written by Globe editors, giving you a concise summary of the day’s most important headlines. Sign up today.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter