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Martinus Pool holds up a donated skateboard in his carpentry workshop in Calgary on May 13. Pool says he receives a steady supply of old and broken skateboards from friends and skate shops in Calgary.Gavin John/The Globe and Mail

Stacks of broken and worn skateboards, blocks of colourful wood, and bowls in various stages of construction pack a garage workshop in Calgary.

The workshop belongs to brothers Adrian and Martinus Pool, avid skateboarders who decided to turn their passion for the sport into a business transforming discarded skateboards into fine art pieces and home decor.

From the left, Anne Tranholm Pool, Adrian Pool, and Martinus Pool sit on the workbench at their carpentry workshop.Gavin John/The Globe and Mail

Martinus Pool scrapes the plastic coating off an old skateboard.Gavin John/The Globe and Mail

Martinus Pool shapes a block of wood into a bowl.Gavin John/The Globe and Mail

Martinus puts the finishing touches on a bowl.Gavin John/The Globe and Mail

Founded 10 years ago, AdrianMartinus – the name of their company – took inspiration from Japanese artist Haroshi, who uses skateboards to craft objects in a distinctive rainbow style. The brothers started by working out of their father’s garage and now manage two locations in Calgary.

The business sources used, old, and broken skateboards from five local stores along with donations from the community to create objects such as bowls and wall art. Making a single bowl requires approximately 10 skateboards, but according to Martinus, each skateboard is used as efficiently as possible: One skateboard can sometimes end up in 30 pieces to minimize waste.

Finished wooden bowls.Gavin John/The Globe and Mail

A wall art mosaic made up of the tops of a number of skateboards.Gavin John/The Globe and Mail

Earrings sit on a work bench in the workshop.Gavin John/The Globe and Mail

Adrian’s wife, Anne Tranholm Pool, joined the company in 2014. She designs and creates jewelry pieces and runs the online store.

Recently, AdrianMartinus started turning skateboards into furniture. Its craftsmanship was recognized by an Etsy Design Award in 2020.

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