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Newfoundland and Labrador is contributing $75,000 to an advertising campaign intended to raise awareness about the risks of youth vaping.

The Newfoundland and Labrador Alliance for the Control of Tobacco, which receives $210,000 annually from the province, announced the campaign called “The New Look of Nicotine Addiction” in St. John’s today.

A news release says the campaign is aimed to educate parents and adults about the risks of vaping.

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Advertisements will appear on billboards, online and on social media.

It will include information about vaping products such as chemical contents, types of devices, effects of nicotine on brain development and youth being targeted by the vaping industry.

The 2018-2019 Canadian Student Tobacco, Alcohol and Drug Survey reported 47 per cent of youth in the province had tried a vaping product, higher than the national average of 34 per cent.

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Vaping-related illnesses have been in the spotlight recently amid accusations the makers of the products are targeting them at youth. Dr. James MacKillop outlines some strategies to use at home in conversations with your children about vaping. MacKillop is the director of the Peter Boris Centre For Addictions Research and co-director of the Michael G. Degroote Centre For Medicinal Cannabis Research. The Globe and Mail (staff)
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