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Michael Kovrig, left, and Michael Spavor are shown in these 2018 images taken from video.

The Associated Press

Canada’s new ambassador to China has met with two Canadian men the People’s Republic imprisoned nearly one year ago.

Dominic Barton led his first consular visits with Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor on Friday and Monday, respectively, said a senior government official.

Mr. Barton was appointed in September, one week before the federal election call, to fill a big diplomatic gap and help repair fractured relations with China after Canada arrested Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou on Dec. 1, 2018, on an extradition request by the United States.

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Days later, China imprisoned Mr. Kovrig, an ex-Canadian diplomat, and Mr. Spavor, an entrepreneur, and accused them of undermining its national security.

It has held them without access to lawyers or their family, or formally charging them in what is widely seen as retaliation for arrest of Ms. Meng.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his cabinet ministers have routinely branded Mr. Kovrig and Mr. Spavor’s incarcerations as arbitrary.

In January, Mr. Trudeau fired his previous China ambassador, former cabinet minister John McCallum, following a number of public comments that broke with the government’s line.

Mr. Barton, who was a well-connected business consultant, was tapped for the diplomatic post because of his high-level business experience in China and throughout Asia, which included serving as the global managing director of consulting giant McKinsey & Co.

Mr. Barton also led the Trudeau government’s influential economic advisory council.

The government has also tried to leverage broad international support from several dozen countries, including the United States, to win the freedom of Mr. Kovrig and Mr. Spavor.

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That effort has angered China, which has banned imports of Canadian canola and other agricultural products.

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