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Good evening, here are the coronavirus updates you need to know tonight.

Top headlines:

  1. Trump’s doctors say they’re monitoring his lungs, hours before the President drives past hospital in a motorcade
  2. Quebec braces for grim month of isolation
  3. Tam suggests virtual Thanksgiving dinner parties, urges particular caution for families in hotspot cities

In Canada, there have been at least 165,998 cases reported. In the last week 12,436 new cases were announced, 32% more than the previous week.

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There have also been at least 140,124 recoveries and 9,478 deaths. Today, 20 new deaths were reported.

Note: 114 of the deaths recorded on the weekend of Oct. 2-4 occurred in the spring and summer and were added as part of a data review, according to the Ontario government.

new deaths canada oct. 4

The Globe and Mail

Worldwide, there have been at least 34,902,647 cases confirmed and 1,033,177 deaths reported.

Sources: Canada data is compiled from government websites, Johns Hopkins and COVID-19 Canada Open Data Working Group; international data is from Johns Hopkins University.


Coronavirus explainers: Coronavirus in maps and charts Lockdown rules and reopening Mask-wearing rules Back to school guide Essential resources


Photo of the day

US President Trump looks on from the back of a car in a motorcade outside of Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 4, 2020. (Photo by ALEX EDELMAN / AFP) (Photo by ALEX EDELMAN/AFP via Getty Images)

ALEX EDELMAN/AFP/Getty Images


Coronavirus in Canada

  • For the third straight day, Quebec reported over 1,000 new cases on Sunday, as the province moved three more towns, in the Gaspé region, into the highest COVID-19 alert level. Although restrictions are less severe than those in the spring, many people are bracing for a grim October in the province.
  • Fall suppers are a long-running harvest-time tradition in the Prairies. But food served buffet-style and eaten shoulder-to-shoulder at long communal tables is a no-no in the time of COVID-19. so community centres have been serving up grub drive-thru style.
  • Ontario has reported 566 new cases and seven more deaths on Sunday, though the province’s health minister says some of the numbers come from a continuing data review in Toronto. The majority of new cases were in Toronto, Peel and Ottawa. Meanwhile, Toronto Public Health is so far behind in reaching patients with newly confirmed coronavirus infections that it has decided to suspend contact tracing outside of outbreaks in congregate settings

In Ottawa, Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam said indoor Thanksgiving gatherings of family or friends should be kept small, especially in provinces such as Quebec and Ontario where infection rates are highest.

Dr. Tam said people celebrating outdoors should follow physical-distancing guidelines and encouraged people to avoid sharing food and other objects during their meals. She also suggested that Canadians opt for virtual Thanksgiving dinners instead of in-person gatherings.

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Her advice comes as new COVID-19 case numbers continued their upward trajectory in several parts of the country, most notably in central Canada, where tighter restrictions have been put in place in recent days to try to prevent the spread of the virus.

Also today: People under 40 are largely driving recent spikes of COVID-19 cases in Canada. As infections mount, universities and provincial governments want to know, what will persuade young people to get serious about COVID-19?


Coronavirus around the world

  • U.S. President Donald Trump has taken two doses of a five-day course of the intravenous antiviral drug Remdesivir, his doctors said at a briefing on Sunday morning, as well as the steroid dexamethasone, which is used in severe cases. He surprised supporters on Sunday when he drove past the hospital in a motorcade.
  • Britain reported a jump in daily COVID-19 cases to a record 22,961 on Sunday, after authorities said a technical issue had meant that over 15,000 test results had not been transferred into computer systems on time,` including for contact tracers.

Coronavirus and business

Royal Bank of Canada’s chief executive officer, Dave McKay, says as recently as four weeks ago, he was feeling good about the country’s economic recovery. The spread of the novel coronavirus looked relatively contained, some businesses showed early signs of bouncing back and credit-card spending was returning to more normal levels. But a sharp spike in COVID-19 cases has quickly deflated his sense of optimism.

  • He fears that many businesses – especially smaller ones – are not financially prepared to withstand a longer path to recovery from the pandemic without renewed support.
  • “We [previously] saw an ability to bridge ourselves economically, from a risk perspective, to a vaccine or to a better outcome. And now the duration of all of this is thrown into question, which is going to really challenge small businesses,” Mr. McKay said.

Aside from beating back the virus once more, “the policies we need, and care we need, on small businesses is, for me, priority number one of our government and of our business leaders.” [For subscribers]

Also today: Gains in the stock market and stable interest rates meant Canadian pension plans kept climbing back to health in the third quarter, but experts question whether the recovery will last.


Globe opinion

  • Cathal Kelly: “Why have the vast majority of U.S. college sports been cancelled or delayed? Public health. Why is football the exception? Money.” [For subscribers]
  • Brianna Bell: “Keeping kids home for every cold or flu symptom will not be sustainable for parents long-term. We need a different plan, because this one isn’t working for us.”

More reporting


Distractions

Last Breaths, 2020 Marcy Friesen Otter fur, pellon, seed beads, 2 cut beads, beading thread, rope, felt, leather thread 15.5″ x 13″ (39.37 x 33.02 cm) including string

Handout

For the art-lover🎨: COVID-19 masks make meaningful, whimsical debuts at art galleries in Vancouver and Banff

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“Great art can come from great challenges. COVID-19 has been a scourge and a torment, but it has also been an inspiration for some artists. Two galleries in the West have installed exhibitions featuring some of this work, much of it made by Indigenous artists. The work is meaningful, beautiful and often whimsical. It injects some beauty, even humour, into the pandemic experience," Marsha Lederman writes.

Information centre

Sources: Canada data are compiled from government websites, Johns Hopkins University and COVID-19 Canada Open Data Working Group; international data are from Johns Hopkins.

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