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Good evening, here are the coronavirus updates you need to know tonight.

Top headlines:

  1. Opposition wins bid to launch probe into federal government’s pandemic response despite Liberals warning of risks to vaccine negotiations
  2. Surprise health care strike prompts Alberta to cancel all non-urgent surgeries, days after scaling back procedures because of rising coronavirus infections
  3. Ontario, Manitoba say Thanksgiving festivities may have boosted COVID-19 numbers in hot spots

In Canada, there have been at least 220,213 cases reported. In the last week 18,776 new cases were announced, 15 per cent more than the previous week.

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There have also been at least 184,303 recoveries and 9,973 deaths. Health officials have administered more than 10,111,128 tests.

new deaths oct. 26

The Globe and Mail

Worldwide, there have been at least 42,990,712 cases confirmed and 1,153,631 deaths reported.

Sources: Canada data is compiled from government websites, Johns Hopkins and COVID-19 Canada Open Data Working Group; international data is from Johns Hopkins University.


Coronavirus explainers: Coronavirus in maps and charts Lockdown rules and reopening Mask-wearing rules Back to school guide Essential resources


Photo of the day

In Nagano, Japan, a woman wearing a face mask takes pictures while walking along a path as the trees begin to change fall foliage colours today.

Kiichiro Sato/The Associated Press


Coronavirus in Canada

  • Ontario said Thanksgiving gatherings may have contributed to an increase in community transmission in the province’s hot spots. The province will release a budget on Nov. 5 focusing largely on pandemic response measures.
  • In Quebec, a coalition of 253 gym, dance and yoga studios said they’ll reopen on Thursday, even as the province announced a partial lockdown would be extended until Nov. 23. Premier François Legault said today that rates of new daily cases and deaths are too high to allow gyms, bars and other entertainment venues to reopen.
  • In Alberta, a strike by hundreds of health care and support workers over the government’s plan to replace up to 11,000 health care jobs with private contractors has prompted the cancellation of many non-urgent surgeries, a week after procedures were scaled back because of an increase in COVID-19 cases. Meanwhile, all of the politicians who came into contact with Municipal Affairs Minister Tracy Allard, who tested positive last week, have tested negative for the virus.
  • In Saskatchewan, the country’s third COVID-19-era election concludes tonight, with voters deciding which party will lead them through the next phase of the pandemic.

In Ottawa, the federal government said a Conservative motion calling for the release of internal documents related to its handling of COVID-19 will jeopardize Canada’s ability to secure a pandemic vaccine.

  • The motion could harm the arrangements Ottawa has already negotiated with manufacturers of vaccines, personal protective equipment and COVID-19 testing kits, as well as continuing talks to secure additional supply, Public Services and Procurement Minister Anita Anand said.
  • The motion calls for the release of documents through the the House of Commons Law Clerk, and specifically calls for information that could compromise personal privacy or national security to be redacted.

The government defeat did not trigger a federal election because it was not declared a matter of confidence.

Also today, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the promised update on the country’s budget will not include a fiscal anchor, citing continuing uncertainty about the course of the pandemic to lock in a specific anchor to guide spending decisions.

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Coronavirus around the world

  • A experimental COVID-19 vaccine, developed by Oxford University in Britain, produces a immune response in both old and young adults, and triggers lower adverse responses among the elderly. AstraZeneca, which helps manufacture the vaccine, did not provide details of the data behind the statement or say when it would publish eagerly awaited late-stage Phase 3 trial data.
  • European governments are imposing new restrictions to try and gain ground in their battles against the COVID-19 resurgence that began two months ago and is leading to hospitals filling up once again.

Globe opinion

  • André Picard: “After eight months of living with COVID-19 in this country, only now are we starting to focus real attention on superspreading and what it means to controlling the pandemic.”
  • Michael Bociurkiw: “Alberta is set to launch a pilot COVID-19 testing procedure at two border points that could slash the quarantine time for returning Canadian travellers from 14 days to as little as 48 hours. That is welcome news indeed. The current quarantine period is unreasonably long.”
  • U.S. President Donald Trump and presidential candidate Joe Biden both campaigned in battleground Pennsylvania today. Trump drew thousands of largely mask-less supporters, while Biden greeted a few dozen supporters outside a Chester, Pa., campaign field office.

More reporting


Information centre

Sources: Canada data are compiled from government websites, Johns Hopkins University and COVID-19 Canada Open Data Working Group; international data are from Johns Hopkins.

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