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Good evening, here are the coronavirus updates you need to know tonight.

Top headlines:

  1. Finance Minister Rod Phillips declares Ontario is in a recession as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic
  2. CRTC providing $72-million to improve internet in 51 northern communities as pandemic shifts life online
  3. Australia records deadliest day with 21 new deaths and 410 cases

In Canada, there have been at least 120,754 cases reported. In the last week 2,567 new cases were announced, 8 per cent fewer than the previous week. There have also been at least 107,123 recoveries and 9,005 deaths. Health officials have administered more than 4,872,329 tests.

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Worldwide, there have been at least 20,343,040 cases confirmed and 742,607 deaths reported.

Sources: Canada data is compiled from government websites, Johns Hopkins and COVID-19 Canada Open Data Working Group; international data is from Johns Hopkins University.


Coronavirus explainers: Updates and essential resourcesCoronavirus in maps and chartsLockdown rules and reopening plans in each provinceGlobal rules on mask-wearing


The Krishna Janmashtami celebrations at the Hindu Heritage Centre in Mississauga included strict physical distancing rules. The Hindu festival celebrating the birth of Lord Krishna normally fills the 600-capacity temple, but on Tuesday evening a maximum of 150 were allowed entry at once. The prayers and songs were also broadcast outside to the line of people waiting to enter to pray.

Melissa Tait/The Globe and Mail


Number of the day

9,000

Deaths from COVID-19 in Canada have surpassed 9,000.


Coronavirus in Canada


In Ottawa, the government announced an additional $305-million for Indigenous communities, to help prevent the spread of coronavirus and better prepare for other emergencies.

  • The new money will flow through the Indigenous community support fund, bringing the total amount to $685-million this year.
  • Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller said communities can also use the money for a variety of other measures, including helping elders and vulnerable people, food insecurity, educational and other supports for children and mental health assistance.

Also today, Miller said a Liberal promise to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is still a top priority, But he could not definitively say whether it is still possible to introduce the needed legislation within the promised timeline, because of the pandemic.

Still in Ottawa, the government also announced $18-million for food producers. The funds follow an initial $252-million bailout package from the government, and is intended to help small producers survive the economic uncertainty caused by the pandemic.

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COVID-19 and long-term care: More than 1,000 of the 1,847 deaths in long-term care in Ontario were in 36 older homes with multibed rooms. Ontario has the highest share of beds in ward rooms in the country, at 33.2 per cent compared to 14 per cent in British Columbia.

And: Canadian and international scientists want to find out how COVID-19 affects the central nervous system, and determine if and how coronavirus leads to lasting brain damage.


Coronavirus around the world

  • Watch: World Health Organization officials warned that Lebanon’s COVID-19 response plan has become more difficult to implement in the aftermath of the massive blast that rocked Beirut last week.
  • In Australia, the state of Victoria reported 21 deaths and 410 new cases in the past 24 hours, ending a run of three consecutive days with new infections below 400. Last week, after a cluster of cases were reported in Victoria, authorities reimposed many lockdown measures.
  • Britain’s economy shrank by 20.4 per cent in the second quarter, the biggest contraction on record. An economist from Berenberg Bank attributes the sharp decline to the lockdown measures being imposed at “a later stage,” which meant they had to persist for longer. Countries, including Germany, which imposed restrictions earlier, were also able to reopen more quickly.
  • In the United States, policy makers at the Federal Reserve said economic growth will be muted until the spread of coronavirus is contained. The country’s deficit rose to a record-breaking US$2.81-trillion, and consumer prices rose more than expected in July.

Coronavirus and business

Metro reported profit of $263.5-million in its third quarter.

  • Same-store sales, a key retail metric, rose more than 10 per cent in the recent quarter.
  • The grocery retailer continues to benefit from the pandemic with strong sales and decreasing coronavirus-related costs after it eliminated its temporary wage bump.

The grocer said it is impossible to predict the duration of the pandemic, or how it will shape retail behaviour long term.

Also today: Bay Street law firms are bringing on partners who work on corporate restructuring as they prepare for a wave of insolvencies as emergency relief measures dry up and lenders start to lose patience with struggling businesses.

And: Airbnb reported its quarterly revenue plunged 67 per cent, with bookings down 30 per cent in June from a year earlier.

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More reporting


Distractions

📚 For the thrill seeker: Three thrillers to entertain readers through the dog days of summer

  • Unspeakable Acts by Sarah Weinman: A carefully curated selection of some of the best true crime work happening now.
  • The Silent Wife by Karin Slaughter: Part of the Sara Linton series, this book centres on an investigation of an old cold crime that may have resulted in the incarceration of an innocent man.
  • Dark August by Katie Tallo: The debut novel from the Ottawa author features excellent characters and solid pacing that keep the story moving as readers whip across a Southern Ontario ghost town.

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