Skip to main content
Canada’s most-awarded newsroom for a reason
Enjoy unlimited digital access
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
Canada’s most-awarded newsroom for a reason
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
// //

Good evening, here are the coronavirus updates you need to know tonight.

Top headlines:

  1. Ottawa was told about potential problems at the Public Health Agency of Canada, top doctors say
  2. Europe hesitant to declare a second wave before deaths catch up to peak numbers
  3. The unrelenting stress of COVID-19 has pushed some Canadian couples to counselling and divorce

In Canada, there have been at least 186,881 cases reported. In the last week 14,665 new cases were announced, 4 per cent more than the previous week.

Story continues below advertisement

There have also been at least 157,486 recoveries and 9,654 deaths. Today, 19 new deaths were reported.

new deaths oct. 13

The Globe and Mail

Worldwide, there have been at least 37,801,526 cases confirmed and 1,080,680 deaths reported.

Sources: Canada data is compiled from government websites, Johns Hopkins and COVID-19 Canada Open Data Working Group; international data is from Johns Hopkins University.


Coronavirus explainers: Coronavirus in maps and charts Lockdown rules and reopening Mask-wearing rules Back to school guide Essential resources


Photo of the day

U.S. Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett speaks during the second day of her confirmation hearing before the Senate judiciary committee on Capitol Hill in Washington on Tuesday. The proceedings continued despite the spectre of COVID-19 in a Senate hearing room that contained the judge’s children and at least one lawmaker who tested positive for the disease. President Donald Trump had formally nominated Barrett at a packed Sept. 26 White House ceremony. Days later, he and a spate of advisers tested positive.

Drew Angerer/The Associated Press


Coronavirus in Canada


In Ottawa, the federal government was warned years ago that the Public Health Agency of Canada was destined for serious problems unless changes were made to its oversight, but those concerns were ignored, two of Canada’s top doctors say.

  • A steady erosion of scientific capacity and a chronic shortage of resources over the past decade have left the agency unable to do its job properly, public-health experts Perry Kendall and Paul Gully said.
  • Recent problems, including the mishandling of the country’s pandemic early warning system, emergency stockpile shortages and allegations that scientists were forced to “dumb down” reports for senior government officials, are all symptoms of a larger ailment afflicting the agency, the doctors said.

Also today, Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer, Theresa Tam, said trick-or-treating should be possible this Halloween as long as parents follow local public-health guidelines.

And: The unrelenting stress of COVID-19 has pushed some Canadian couples to counselling and divorce

Story continues below advertisement


Coronavirus around the world

  • Eli Lilly and Co. said the U.S. government-sponsored clinical trial of its COVID-19 antibody treatment, similar to one taken by President Donald Trump, has been paused because of a safety concern. Eli made the announcement one day after Johnson & Johnson said it was forced to pause a large high-profile trial of its experimental coronavirus vaccine because a volunteer fell ill.
  • Cases of COVID-19 are climbing across Europe but some scientists and doctors are hesitant to call it a full-blown second wave. The fatality rates – so far – are not nearly as high as they were during the peak of the pandemic.
  • Portuguese forward Cristiano Ronaldo has tested positive for COVID-19, Portugal’s Football Federation said in a statement on its website on Tuesday.

Coronavirus and business

Cineplex’s chief executive officer said restrictions that have again closed 22 of its 68 theatres are “excessive” and argued cinemas are “fundamentally different” from other indoor retail environments.

Also today: Amid a second wave of the pandemic, some parents are struggling to decide if they can afford not to work or pay for full-time child care.

And: Porter Airlines delayed the restart of operations by another five weeks to mid-December.


Globe opinion

Bharat Masrani: “Future generations will look back at our response to COVID-19 and judge us by how we supported those who were disproportionately impacted – how we came together to lift each other up in the wake of this crisis.”

Kevin Bryan: “The upshot is clear: Tailoring restrictions appropriately during a second-wave lockdown is crucial. On both economic and long-term health grounds, we should endeavour to keep open upstream sectors such as manufacturing, transportation and natural resource extraction.”


More reporting


Information centre

Sources: Canada data are compiled from government websites, Johns Hopkins University and COVID-19 Canada Open Data Working Group; international data are from Johns Hopkins.

Story continues below advertisement

What are we missing? Email us: audience@globeandmail.com. Do you know someone who needs this newsletter? Send them to our Newsletters page.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies