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Good evening, here are the coronavirus updates you need to know tonight.

Top headlines:

  1. Spain passes 500,000 coronavirus cases in Western European first
  2. Tam urges caution as daily cases of COVID-19 rise 25 per cent in last week
  3. India overtakes Brazil in coronavirus infections, some rail services resume

In Canada, there have been at least 132,017 cases reported. In the past week 3,068 new cases were announced, 7 per cent fewer than the previous week.

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Worldwide, there have been at least 27,103,845 cases confirmed and 883,339 deaths reported.

Sources: Canada data is compiled from government websites, Johns Hopkins and COVID-19 Canada Open Data Working Group; international data is from Johns Hopkins University.


Coronavirus explainers: Updates and essential resourcesCoronavirus in maps and chartsLockdown rules and reopening plans in each provinceGlobal rules on mask-wearingBack to school


Photo of the day

A teacher wearing a mask to protect against COVID-19 welcomes a pupil on the first day of school after summer holidays at Colegio Pureza de Maria school in Bilbao, Spain, on Monday.

VINCENT WEST/Reuters


Number of the day

6%

Spain’s mortality rate among COVID-19 patients since the pandemic first began, which is lower than Italy, Britain and France.

  • The country reported eight new deaths on Monday, bringing its total to 29,516.
  • Recent infections have been more common among younger people who often don’t show symptoms and the death rate still remains far below the March-April peak.

What it means: While hospitals should be able to keep fatalities in check, experts are concerned about the long-term effects on the health system as people recover over the following months.


Coronavirus in Canada


In Ottawa, Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam says a slow but steady increase in the number of people testing positive for COVID-19 is a cause for concern.

  • Over the past week, the average daily number of people testing positive for COVID-19 was 545, a 25-per-cent increase from the average of 435 the previous week, and 390 the week before that.
  • While Tam says most Canadians have followed public-health advice, she is concerned about the increase in positive cases, especially as cold weather shifts activities indoors.

Coronavirus around the world

Indian passengers queue up for COVID-19 tests at a facility erected at a railway station to screen people coming from outside the city, in Ahmedabad, India, on Monday. India's coronavirus cases are now the second-highest in the world and only behind the United States.

Ajit Solanki/The Associated Press

  • India has overtaken Brazil in COVID-19 infection numbers, making it second only to the United States globally. The world’s second-most populous country reported a record jump of more than 90,000 cases on Monday, pushing its total tally past 4.2 million, more than 68,000 ahead of Brazil. The numbers are jumping as the government resumed underground train services and announced plans to reopen the Taj Mahal this month.
  • A combination of COVID-19 and climate change is fuelling Southern Africa’s hunger upsurge. An estimated 45 million people in the region are food insecure, and the number of people without access to adequate affordable and nutritious food is up 10 per cent from last year, says World Food Program.

Globe opinion

  • André Picard: The pandemic is far from over. The virus is unforgiving. None of this is comforting to parents as most students prepare to return to school after Labour Day. It can’t be repeated enough that the single most important factor in keeping children (and teachers, and family members back at home) safe is maintaining low numbers in the community.”
  • Goldy Hyder: “The demographic factors that drive Canada’s need for immigrants have not changed due to COVID-19. Neither, it seems, has public support for immigration. In a Leger poll this summer, respondents agreed by a three-to-one margin that newcomers will help rather than hurt Canada’s long-term economic recovery. The sooner Canada’s immigration system gets back on track, the better.
  • Hassan Yussuff: “We didn’t need a pandemic to show us that too many workers in Canada are often living paycheque to paycheque and worried about the future of their families; that women and racialized workers often make up the majority of those doing precarious, low-paid – but essential – front-line work.”
  • Irfan Dhalla: “With summer nearing an end, now is the time for Canadian governments to adopt a new strategy, stop a second wave, and save our winter.”

Distractions

🥗 For the health nut:

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Beans, lentils and split peas, known collectively as pulses, are staples in many diets around the world – think falafel, Greek fava and dahl. In North America, though, pulses are often overlooked.

Which is a shame. Pulses are one of the most nutrient-dense foods around.


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