Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

Two Kingston Police cars block a road leading to the site of a fatal plane crash, in Kingston, Ont., on Nov. 28, 2019.

Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press

The Ontario coroner’s office says it will likely be several days before the victims of this week’s plane crash are publicly identified, but a friend of the pilot says the man and his entire family were among those killed.

A spokeswoman for the coroner’s office says in a statement that four adults and three children were killed when a small plane crashed into a wooded area in Kingston on Wednesday.

“The identities of the deceased persons will not be released to authorities until they have all been positively identified by scientific methods and next of kin have been notified,” issues manager Cheryl Mahyr said in a statement. “We anticipate this will take several days to complete.”

Story continues below advertisement

However, Austin, Tex., resident Ali Kodirov said the pilot was his friend Otabek Oblokulov, and the man’s wife and three children also died in the crash.

“I’m shocked and I still can’t believe this happened, it’s a big loss for us,” said Mr. Kodirov, who said he’s known Mr. Oblokulov since 2003, when he helped Mr. Kodirov settle in the United States after immigrating from Uzbekistan.

Mr. Kodirov said Mr. Oblokulov was a Houston resident and part of the Uzbek community in the Texan city.

“He was a really nice family guy and very helpful to the community in Houston.”

Dana Atkinson, president of Anson Aviation in Sugar Land, Tex., said Mr. Oblokulov trained at his aviation school and was known to many people in the local aviation community.

“He was very friendly, very outgoing and well-liked,” Mr. Atkinson said, adding that his company helped Mr. Oblokulov buy his plane, identified by investigators as a Piper PA-32, so he could travel with his family.

“We’re all sad any time something like this happens.”

Story continues below advertisement

Mr. Atkinson said his company helped connect Mr. Oblokulov with a third-party seller to purchase the plane and performed routine oil changes on it.

A GoFundMe page raising money for the Oblokulov family had raised more than $16,000 dollars by Friday afternoon.

The cause of Wednesday’s crash is still under investigation, but the Transportation Safety Board has said weather conditions were deteriorating at the time of the incident.

A spokesperson from nearby Canadian Forces Base said their search helicopter dealt with high winds while looking for the wreckage, while local residents said there was also heavy rain in the area at the time of the crash.

The TSB said the plane took off from the Toronto area and was headed for Quebec City, but early indications show the pilot had made plans to land in Kingston.

A statement on the board’s website said that prior to the crash, “There were communications between the pilot and Kingston Flight Service Station.”

Story continues below advertisement

Ken Webster, a TSB investigator heading up the probe, said the number of passengers will be another area of investigation. He said some models of the Piper PA-32 aircraft have only six seats, while others have seven.

“However, we found six seats at the accident site.... We do look closely at this kind of information,” Mr. Webster said.

A team of four TSB investigators have been assigned to the case.

Our Morning Update and Evening Update newsletters are written by Globe editors, giving you a concise summary of the day’s most important headlines. Sign up today.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies