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Good evening, let’s start with today’s top stories:

Brazil refuses to consider G7′s Amazon aid unless Macron retracts ‘insults’

Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro says he will not consider accepting the more than US$22-million offer from the G7 countries to help fight forest fires in the Amazon unless French President Emmanuel Macron withdraws the “insults” made against him.

The two leaders have become embroiled in a public war of words. Macron has called Bolsonaro a liar, and said Brazilian women are probably ashamed of their president.

Meanwhile, weak rainfall is unlikely to extinguish a record number of fires raging any time soon, according to weather data and two experts.

Opinion: “In the Amazon, more than just Brazil’s sovereign interest is at stake. ... If the government of Brazil puts that asset at grave risk, thereby endangering the lives of others around the world, then the international community must act – in the name of humanity.” Lloyd Axworthy and Allan Rock, former foreign minister and former ambassador to the United Nations

Background: Here is what’s happening with the Amazon fires, the climate context and how you can help.

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Scotiabank hikes dividend, while Bank of Montreal’s profit edges up; OSC’s allegations against RBC, TD

Bank of Nova Scotia and Bank of Montreal released third-quarter results today. Rising international banking profit and lower expected loan losses helped to propel strong results at Scotiabank, while the Bank of Montreal’s earnings suffered from relative weakness in those same areas.

Scotiabank has raised its quarterly dividend by 3 cents to 90 cents a share, following a similar move by Royal Bank of Canada last week to boost its payout to $1.05 a share.

Separately, the Ontario Securities Commission is pursuing settlements with RBC and Toronto-Dominion Bank as part of global investigations into foreign-exchange traders.

The OSC alleges that employees at both banks used electronic chat rooms “many hundreds” of times from 2011 to 2013 to share confidential customer information with foreign-exchange traders at outside firms. The traders had a “profit motive," said the OSC, which has scheduled hearings for both banks on Friday.

Read more: Scotiabank caught in escalating standoff over sale of Antiguan operations

Trustee overseeing Quadriga’s bankruptcy says it’s working with four agencies including RCMP

Four law enforcement and regulatory agencies, including the RCMP, are investigating QuadrigaCX, according to the trustee overseeing the now-defunct cryptocurrency exchange’s bankruptcy proceedings.

Ernst & Young says it has received formal document requests relating to some of the investigations, including from the RCMP’s financial crime division, and is looking to move the case to Toronto from Halifax to make it less costly to comply with the probes.

Other agencies investigating Quadriga include the Ontario Securities Commission and the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Once Canada’s largest cryptocurrency exchange, Quadriga was shuttered earlier this year following the sudden death of CEO Gerald Cotten. An estimated 76,000 Quadriga users have been unable to access roughly $214.6-million of their funds – much of which appears to be missing.

New trial ordered for two men convicted in Via Rail terror plot

Raed Jaser and Chiheb Esseghaier, found guilty of terrorism charges in connection with a plot to derail a passenger train between Canada and the U.S., have been granted a new trial. Ontario’s Court of Appeal found the jury that convicted them was improperly selected.

The two were found guilty in 2015 on a total of eight terror-related charges between them. They were sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole until 2023.

They challenged their convictions, and lawyers for Jaser argued the trial judge mistakenly rejected their client’s request regarding the method of jury selection.

ALSO ON OUR RADAR

Alberta’s fiscal update: Alberta’s first fiscal update since the election shows modest increases in resource revenues and income taxes, though the government is still warning of difficult times ahead as it prepares for an austerity budget to be tabled in October.

Andreescu advances at U.S. Open: Canadian teen phenom Bianca Andreescu has advanced to the second round of the U.S. Open after posting a 6-2, 6-4 win over American Katie Volynets. Other Canadians in singles action today include Felix Auger-Aliassime and Denis Shapovalov, who play each other. Check back later tonight for scores and highlights at GlobeSports.com.

Accusers testify weeks after Epstein’s death: A succession of women who say Jeffrey Epstein sexually abused them voiced anger and defiance at a dramatic hearing in New York today, less than three weeks after the financier killed himself while awaiting trial on sex trafficking charges.

Costco’s first China store overwhelmed: U.S. hypermarket chain Costco Wholesale was forced to shut its first store in China early on its opening day today, according to state media, after large crowds flocked through the door and caused traffic jams in the Shanghai neighbourhood.

Open this photo in gallery:

(Photo by Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images)HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images

MARKET WATCH

Wall Street stocks slipped today, weighed down by financial stocks as a deepened yield curve inversion raised U.S. recession worries, while uncertainty continued to plague any signs of progress on trade negotiations between the United States and China.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 120.93 points, to 25,777.90, the S&P 500 lost 9.22 points to close at 2,869.16, and the Nasdaq Composite dropped 26.79 points to 7,826.95.

Canada’s main stock index closed higher, thanks to higher crude oil prices and gold continuing to gain traction amid recession concerns. The Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index closed up 84.80 points at 16,183.59.

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TALKING POINTS

Catherine McKenna’s carbon-tax gaffe gives the Conservatives a gift

“Now, the carbon-tax discussion will be entirely framed around a Conservative narrative that the Liberals are lying about what they intend to do with the tax. ... It will serve as a cover for a party that has no credible climate plan itself.” - Gary Mason

Connor McDavid does not look, sound or feel like a man who enjoys his work

“Four years into the Connor McDavid era, McDavid kept getting better and the Edmonton Oilers kept getting worse. No one seemed more confused by this turn of events than the man at the middle of it.” - Cathal Kelly

LIVING BETTER

Planning to take in some shows at the Toronto International Film Festival this year? Ahead of next week’s opening, The Globe’s arts team put together their lists of the most anticipated movies on the TIFF schedule. They include the latest from Pedro Almodovar, an Ellen Page documentary and a star turn by Joachim Phoenix as the Batman villain in Joker.

LONG READ FOR A LONG COMMUTE

Grief is love, and I have to learn how to live with it

Two lovers walk under the winter solstice full moon; arms intertwined. “This is going to be a special year for us,” he says. “I think it’s the start of something new.” “Let’s have another baby,” I whisper, as we stop to kiss under the trees. A week later, he wakes up feeling a bit unwell. He is dead within three months.

That blissfully simple moment under the moon feels like it happened to another person, light years away although in reality it was only a few months ago. Since then, I’ve learned that a freckle on your cheek can kill you. I’ve learned that it doesn’t matter if you’re strong and healthy and kind. Brian, the love of my life and the father of my little girl, has died of melanoma at 41.

“We cry for Bri every night,” a friend says to me. She and her husband are good friends and she’s trying to tell me that they care. But all I hear is the word “we” and it makes me want to scream in my solitude. The image of them sharing a sacred moment of grief makes my heart ache for Brian with a depth that I didn’t know existed. Read Mira Simone Etlin-Stein’s full essay here.

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