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Good evening, let’s start with today’s top stories:

Game on: Federal election 2019 under way as Trudeau visits Rideau Hall

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau visited Governor-General Julie Payette at Rideau Hall Wednesday morning to request the dissolution of Parliament. This marks the official start of the federal election campaign that will span 40 days, ending with Canada going to the polls on Oct. 21. The leaders have spent the summer test-driving election-campaign messaging and they are expected to discuss key issues, such as affordability (including housing) and the environment, in the official push to the polls.

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Ottawa blocks RCMP on SNC-Lavalin inquiry, Scheer calls on Trudeau to allow all witnesses to testify

The RCMP has been looking into potential obstruction of justice in the handling of the prosecution of SNC-Lavalin Group Inc., but its examination has been stymied by the federal government’s refusal to lift cabinet confidentiality for all witnesses, The Globe and Mail has learned. This means individuals involved in the matter cannot discuss events or share documents with police that have not been exempted from the rule of cabinet confidentiality, according to sources, who The Globe agreed not to identify so they could discuss the RCMP inquiries.

Reacting to the story in The Globe and Mail, Andrew Scheer said it is still within the power of the Prime Minister to remove the obstacle that has limited the national police force’s ability to examine potential obstruction of justice in the handling of the prosecution of the Montreal-based engineering firm.

Quebec court strikes down parts of laws on medically assisted death, calling them unconstitutional

Key parts of both federal and provincial laws on medical assistance in dying (MAID) have been struck down by the Quebec Superior Court, which said that the requirements that applicants have to be close to an imminent death are unconstitutional, forcing people with degenerative conditions to keep on living in great pain. Quebec is the only province that has legislation on assisted dying. It was enacted before the federal amendments to the Criminal Code on MAID. In a decision released Monday, Justice Christine Baudoin said she would suspend her ruling for six months to allow lawmakers to deal with its fallout. However, she exempted the two plaintiffs who had challenged the law so they can go ahead with their bid to get medical assistance in dying.

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Bianca Andreescu finally hears from Drake, tennis champion reveals as she returns to Canada

Andreescu was home in Toronto, fresh off a whirlwind media tour in New York following her stunning win over Serena Williams to become Canada’s first Grand Slam champ. Drake had just contacted her – the latest in a stream of mind-blowing happenings for the 19-year-old Canadian tennis star since she won the U.S Open on Saturday. “Drake messaged me! I’m actually having a conversation with him,” said the excited teen, flipping out her phone to read the message aloud to reporters. She covered a wide range of topics in Wednesday’s press conference, from her hopes to play for Canada in the Olympics, her goal of becoming one of the Top 3 on the WTA Tour this year, her flight home from New York on a private jet.

ALSO ON OUR RADAR

U.S. vows to ‘never forget’ as ceremonies held to mark anniversary of Sept. 11 attacks: People who were too young on 9/11 to even remember their lost loved ones, and others for whom the grief is still raw, paid their tributes to the dead as America marked the 18th anniversary of the attacks.

From Hustlers to Joker to Parasite, make way for a class war this fall movie season at TIFF: But at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival, one particularly ruthless message has bled through the programming more than most: Eat the rich – because the rest of us are dying.

Indigenous, two-spirit couple from Alberta wins The Amazing Race Canada: Now that they’ve been crowned the winners, the married couple said they want to use their fame to continue fundraising for a cultural healing centre in Alberta’s Kehewin Cree Nation.

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Scottish appeal court rules British PM Boris Johnson’s move to suspend Parliament unlawful: The ruling by the panel of three judges throws more confusion into Brexit and raises new questions about whether MPs will be able to thwart Mr. Johnson’s pledge to pull the country out of the European Union on Oct. 31, no matter what.

Trump administration to propose banning flavours used in e-cigarettes: It will take several weeks to develop the proposed flavour restrictions with the Food and Drug Administration, which will be subject to public input before taking effect.

MARKET WATCH

Canada’s main stock index finished the session up on Wednesday as tech stocks jumped on gains in BlackBerry and Shopify. The Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index was up 73.80 points to 16,611.14. On Wall Street, stocks were boosted by tariff-sensitive technology and industrial stocks as China decided to exempt some U.S. products from tariffs. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 226.6 points to 27,136.03, the S&P 500 gained 21.34 points to 3,000.73 and the Nasdaq Composite added 85.52 points to 8,169.68.

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TALKING POINTS

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The next prime minister can solve Canada’s housing crisis by working with municipal leaders

Bill Karsten: “Party leaders must expand on efforts to provide surplus federal lands for the development of affordable and social housing. Removing the cost of land from development can drive the deep affordability that’s needed in our communities.” Karsten is the president of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and councillor for Halifax Regional Municipality, Nova Scotia

Ottawa willfully discriminated against First Nations children. Silence is no longer an option

Cindy Blackstock: “Politicians and government departments remain silent because they want the Canadian public to look away. They don’t want us to see the government’s discrimination, and for the most part, their strategy has worked.” Blackstock is the executive director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada. She is also a professor at the school of social work at McGill University.

LIVING BETTER

When you order fish in a restaurant, it is often presented with a crispy skin on top and perfectly cooked fish underneath. Making crispy-skinned fish is a real skill, but with the right tools, the right fish, my tips and a bit of confidence, it is very easy. It starts with the right pan. Next, you’ll need to visit a fishmonger, as their fish is usually sold with the skin on. Then the steps for cooking become the most important part. Follow these steps and wow your guests at your next dinner party.

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LONG READ FOR A LONG COMMUTE

The opera season ahead of us will see ambitious revivals, fresh twists and rare productions of works spanning centuries – in venues spread across the country. From the Canadian Opera Company, Antonin Dvorak’s Rusalka, it turns out, has something for all types of opera fans. In Montreal, Beethoven’s Fidelio is famously difficult to sing to, but the score is as dense as dramatic. Puccini’s Il trittico, produced this fall by Pacific Opera Victoria, is a bit of a gem of the operatic repertoire. Take a look at The Globe’s Fall opera preview, including five upcoming shows around Canada.

Evening Update is written by Sierra Bein. If you’d like to receive this newsletter by e-mail every weekday evening, go here to sign up. If you have any feedback, send us a note.

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