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Coronavirus information
Coronavirus information
The Zero Canada Project provides resources to help you manage your health, your finances and your family life as Canada reopens.
Visit the hub

Good evening, let’s start with today’s top coronavirus stories:

Stroke can be the first presenting symptom of young patients with COVID-19, new Canadian research shows

Strokes occur relatively frequently among patients with COVID-19 and tend to have devastating consequences, according to a new study that estimates nearly one in 50 patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19 experiences a stroke.

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The study, published today in the medical journal Neurology, found both the proportion of patients with the disease who have a stroke and their mortality rate are “exceedingly high.” Senior author Luciano Sposato is an associate professor of neurology at the University of Western Ontario.

The researchers also found in about half of young patients under the age of 50, stroke was the first symptom of COVID-19.

In other COVID-19 news: Health Minister Patty Hajdu says Canadians should expect a “much more surgical approach” to future lockdowns triggered by spikes in the number of COVID-19 cases. Speaking to reporters at a cabinet retreat in Ottawa, Hajdu said her government is preparing for the possibility of a second wave, but added that another full-scale shutdown like the one Canadians saw in the spring would be difficult.

Quebec is doubling the number of regions in its second pandemic alert level to eight, including Montreal, following five consecutive days with more than 200 new reported cases. Premier François Legault called the situation critical and is calling on all Quebeckers to limit private gatherings as much as possible to slow the spread of the virus.

Read more:

This is the daily Evening Update newsletter. If you’re reading this on the web, or it was sent to you as a forward, you can sign up for Evening Update and more than 20 more Globe newsletters here. If you like what you see, please share it with your friends.

U.S. backs down on aluminum tariffs directed at Canada

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The U.S. government has axed controversial tariffs on Canadian aluminum first announced in August, but also warned it would re-impose them if shipments to the United States exceed specific volumes in the months ahead.

The news came this afternoon, only hours before Canada was set to unveil $3.6-billion in retaliatory measures on U.S. imports.

The office of U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said it reversed tariffs following “consultations with the Canadian government” during which it determined that shipments from Canada would be dropping in volume in the months ahead, and the 10-per-cent tariff would be removed retroactive to Sept. 1.

ALSO ON OUR RADAR

A photo of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, posted on his Instagram account, shows hims with wife Yulia, right, in a hospital hospital in Berlin, Germany.

The Canadian Press

“Hi, this is Navalny”: Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny has posted a photo of himself from his hospital bed in Germany where he’s recuperating from being poisoned with a nerve agent, joking about being able to breathe on his own: “I liked it very much. ... Strongly recommended.”

Leslyn Lewis’s MP bid: Leslyn Lewis, the Toronto lawyer who finished third in the federal Conservative leadership race, says she’ll seek election as an MP in the rural Ontario riding of Haldimand-Norfolk, held since 2004 by Conservative stalwart Diane Finley.

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New contract for Nurse: The Toronto Raptors have signed head coach Nick Nurse, named NBA coach of the year this past season, to a multiyear contract extension.

New Apple bundle: Apple has rolled out a new virtual fitness service and a bundle of all its subscriptions, Apple One, focusing on services that cater to customers working at home during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Rowling controversy: Bestselling Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling has stoked anger in the transgender community by including a cross-dressing serial killer in her latest novel, Troubled Blood, penned under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith and published today.

MARKET WATCH

Global equities rallied today, first on upbeat Chinese data and later on an increase in U.S. factory output. Canada’s main stock index gained as domestic factory sales rose for a third straight month in July, signaling that a post-pandemic economic rebound was on track.

The Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index closed up 71.13 points or 0.43 per cent at 16,431.27.

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The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 2.27 points or 0.01 per cent to 27,994.75, the S&P 500 gained 17.58 points or 0.52 per cent to 3,401.12 and the Nasdaq Composite added 133.67 points or 1.21 per cent to 11,190.32.

Got a news tip that you’d like us to look into? E-mail us at tips@globeandmail.com. Need to share documents securely? Reach out via SecureDrop.

TALKING POINTS

Why the Liberals shouldn’t call an election this fall

“Trudeau believes Canadians want more than simply a return to the status quo. I don’t know about you, but I’d give my eyeteeth for a return to the status quo.” - John Ibbitson

On the issue of climate change, we are choking

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“Scientists have been warning about this day for ages. A warming planet would force a reckoning, they said. Well, we are living it now. The real tragedy? Our political leaders still aren’t prepared to do anything about it.” - Gary Mason

A man cycles in Vancouver's Stanley Park as smoke from wildfires in neighbouring Washington shrouds the skyline on Sept. 14, 2020.

JENNIFER GAUTHIER/Reuters

LIVING BETTER

Looking for ways to use up the rest of your summer tomatoes? Lucy Waverman has 10 recipes for you to try, including salads, pizza, pasta and more. Plus she offers a primer on tomato varieties and tips on buying and preparing your bounty. (Pro tip: Do not refrigerate.)

TODAY’S LONG READ

The seven little words I’ve been waiting my whole motherhood to say

It’s been one, very small, dull-silver lining of the pandemic: My children have been roaming the neighbourhood, without me.

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If you’re over 60, you may not be aware that children no longer run around carefree in their neighbourhoods without direct adult supervision. If you’re under 30, you may be equally shocked to learn that this used to be a thing. Children would run off with their friends, nary to be seen until suppertime. This isn’t just a fantasy from movies and Little House on the Prairie storybooks. It actually happened. In real life.

And it’s happening again. This is how it came to pass that I could tell the older ones the seven little words I had been waiting my whole motherhood to say: “Just be home in time for dinner.” Read Susan Vukadinovic’s full essay here.

Evening Update is presented by S.R. Slobodian. If you’d like to receive this newsletter by e-mail every weekday evening, go here to sign up. If you have any feedback, send us a note.

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