Skip to main content

Canada Marine group reports Beluga rescued from New Brunswick river last year spotted alive and well

A young beluga that was rescued from a New Brunswick river and released in Quebec last year has been spotted alive and well off the coast of Nova Scotia, a marine mammal research group said Friday.

The Group for Research and Education on Marine Mammals said in a statement that the whale was spotted last week near Ingonish, Cape Breton, in the company of another male beluga.

A beluga whale is rescued after getting stuck in the Nepisiguit River in Bathurst, N.B., on Thursday, June 15, 2017.

Globe and Mail Update

“According to the images that have been transmitted to us, the Nepisiguit beluga appears to be in good health. He appears vigorous and is swimming well,” said veterinarian Stephane Lair of the Universite de Montreal.

Story continues below advertisement

The rescued whale was saved in a complex operation in June 2017 that saw the endangered marine mammal travel by land, sea and air before being returned to the sea near Cacouna, Que.

The group tracked the whale by satellite in the hopes of determining whether the release would be successful, but lost track of it 19 days later.

Director Robert Michaud said researchers were pleased to see the animal appeared healthy, but were puzzled as to why it travelled so far away from where it was released.

He said the group will try to gather more information to find out why the wayward whale didn’t stay in the St. Lawrence Estuary, where it could contribute to the recovery of the animals’ population.

In the meantime, Michaud asked the public not to get too close to the adventurous mammal in the hopes it will eventually go back home.

“The best chance for these animals to return to their fellow belugas is if we minimize our interactions with them,” he said in the statement.

Report an error
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter