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Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer holds Canadian-U.S. citizenship

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Speaking to reporters Thursday in Bedford, N.S., after a campaign rally at a Chinese restaurant, Mr. Scheer said he made the decision to renounce his U.S. citizenship after he became leader of the party in May, 2017. A campaign spokesman said earlier in the day that Mr. Scheer’s father, who was born in the United States and holds joint citizenship, obtained U.S. citizenship and passports for his son and two daughters when they were born in Canada. He said Mr. Scheer submitted paperwork in August to renounce his citizenship and is waiting for confirmation that he is no longer an American citizen. Mr. Scheer, 40, has let his U.S. passport lapse, the spokesman said, has never voted in U.S. elections but has regularly filed taxes as required of American citizens no matter where they live.

Read more from the campaign trail:

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After Trump calls on China to investigate Bidens, released text messages show attempted negotiations with Ukraine

U.S. President Donald Trump has openly called for both China and Ukraine to investigate one of his chief political rivals – publicly soliciting the kind of foreign election interference for which he already faces an impeachment inquiry.

Meanwhile, a slew of newly-released text messages appear to show that several of Mr. Trump’s advisors attempted to negotiate a meeting between the President and his Ukrainian counterpart, Volodymyr Zelensky, in exchange for Mr. Zelensky opening the investigation. In the texts, one top diplomat repeatedly raised concerns that the Trump administration was withholding military aid to Ukraine in order to push Kiev on the probe.

In 2013, Hunter Biden accompanied his father on an official trip to Beijing, during which the younger Mr. Biden met with a business associate. Mr. Trump has presented no basis for his assertions that the elder Mr. Biden intervened to help his son’s work in China.

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After 60 years, death of last Sable Island horse reopens debate over animals’ fate

“It’s the end of an era,” said Tabitha Cox, head nature interpreter at Shubenacadie Wildlife Park north of Halifax. “He was such a unique animal to have.”

The only remaining Sable Island horse in captivity was euthanized this week by veterinarians, triggering a renewed debate about what to do with the 400 or so feral horses that still live on a remote spit of sand some 300 kilometres off the coast of Nova Scotia. Almost 70 years ago, the horses were targeted for removal from Sable Island after biologists said they were damaging the habitat. But the federal government’s After 60 years, death of last Sable Island horse reopens debate over animals’ fateplan, which would have sent the animals to work in coal mines or slaughtered them for dog food and hides, drew protests from schoolchildren. Today, there’s still no agreement about what to do. Some scientists say the animals’ constant grazing has turned the island into a desert, dramatically altering the ecosystem and pushing out native seabirds and other species.

Toronto, York, Peel and other Ontario boards to close schools Monday if CUPE workers begin strike

Several Ontario school boards plan to shut down on Monday in anticipation of a strike by a union representing 55,000 support workers, forcing parents to scramble for alternative arrangements for their children in a matter of days. The potential school closings come after the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) said on Wednesday that it had provided the legally required five-day notice for a strike, just two days into a work-to-rule campaign. Talks are scheduled to resume on Friday between CUPE’s Ontario School Board Council of Unions, which negotiates centrally on behalf of the union’s school-board employees, and the government and trustees’ association. Some boards said they would not be able to operate their schools safely during a strike, others said they would close on Monday if there was strike action.

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ALSO ON OUR RADAR

Defence says RCMP illegally gave serial numbers, other details about Meng Wanzhou’s electronics to FBI: A lawyer for the Huawei executive said Mounties provided information that enables U.S. authorities to find out calls made and received, phone numbers, time and duration of calls and the physical location of cell towers where calls were connected.

Three former St. Michael’s students plead guilty in sex assault scandal: The teens each pleaded guilty to one count of sexual assault with a weapon and one count of assault with a weapon. One of them also pleaded guilty to making child pornography.

Israel swears in newly elected parliament amid political deadlock: The typically festive event was marked mostly by uncertainty, as the two main candidates for prime minister sniped at each other over who should lead the country.

Vaping-related deaths in United States rise to 18, illnesses surpass 1,000: Public health officials are still at a loss to explain the cause of the severe lung illnesses, which have reached 1,080 cases across 48 states and one U.S. territory so far, up from 805 cases last week.

MORNING MARKETS

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After bruising week, global stocks make fragile gains ahead of U.S jobs data: Global stocks were slightly higher on Friday, clawing back some ground lost during their worst week in months, and safe haven assets rose ahead of a key jobs report as investors hoped this week’s dismal data would trigger more U.S. interest rate cuts. In Asia, Japan’s Nikkei ended up 0.32 per cent. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng fell 1.11 per cent. In Europe, Britain’s FTSE 100 gained 0.05 per cent just before 6 a.m. ET. Germany’s DAX lost 0.28 per cent and France’s CAC 40 slid 0.15 per cent. New York futures were modestly weaker.

WHAT EVERYONE’S TALKING ABOUT

Jagmeet Singh and the costs of being Canadian

Denise Balkissoon: “Jagmeet Singh deserves a Luther. A fictional character played by the American comedian Keegan-Michael Key, Luther was Barack Obama’s ‘anger translator,’ an alter-ego that reacted to racism in a way the first black president of the United States could not.”

A reborn Bloc Québécois shakes up the battle for Quebec

Konrad Yakabuski: “Perhaps not in the way that it dominated federal politics in Quebec for nearly two decades between 1993 and 2011. But the sovereigntist party that not long ago seemed headed for the dust heap seems to have regained enough strength to play the spoiler in the Oct. 21 election.”

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TODAY’S EDITORIAL CARTOON

Brian Gable/The Globe and Mail

LIVING BETTER

Ready to relax? Start your weekend planning early with The Globe and Mail’s guide to every feature film arriving this weekend, from would-be blockbusters to under-the-radar indies. Movies you’ll want to know more about include Where’s My Roy Cohn?, First Love, Human Nature and In the Tall Grass. Joker is not nearly as dangerous, or interesting, as the internet would have you believe. Panama Papers comedy (yes, comedy) The Laundromat is at least half a good investment of your time.

MOMENT IN TIME

This Friday, March 22, 2019, photo shows Mount Rushmore in Keystone, S.D. From left are former presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

David Zalubowski/The Associated Press

Oct. 4, 1927

Mount Rushmore was conceived as a way to promote tourism to the Black Hills region of South Dakota. In the early days, a prominent local historian almost succeeded in winning approval to carve the features of American West heroes into the granite face. However, the sculptor Gutzon Borglum balked, insisting that 60-foot-tall profiles of four of the country’s most important presidents – George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln – would have far broader appeal. He was undoubtedly right. The towering images of the men – who symbolize the country’s birth, growth, development and preservation – took 400 workers more than 14 years to (partly) complete. The original plan was to carve the men from head to waist, but lack of funds effectively cut them off at the neck. Regardless, the monument is one of the most iconic symbols of the United States, on par with the Statue of Liberty. Even Alfred Hitchcock could not resist its allure, and featured Mount Rushmore as a backdrop in his 1959 classic North by Northwest. Sometimes called the Shrine of Democracy, the sculpture represents the first 130 years of the country’s history and attracts more than 2.5 million visitors each year. — Gayle MacDonald

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