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Medical authorities in New Brunswick are cautioning people who may have been exposed to a second case of measles in the Saint John area to watch for symptoms and make sure they’ve been vaccinated.

Dr. Jennifer Russell, the chief medical officer of health, said the case was confirmed at Kennebecasis Valley High School in the last few days.

She did not give the person’s age or say if they are a student or staff member, but it appears the virus was contracted from another recently confirmed patient with measles.

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“The person in that first case is related to the second case in that they were in the Saint John Emergency Department at the same time,” Russell said.

She said officials are contacting people who may have crossed paths with the latest case.

“This person is isolating at home currently, and we’re working with the superintendents and the school and the health authority to make sure that everything we can do to identify the individuals who’ve been in contact with this individual are identified and they know to look for signs and symptoms of measles,” she said.

Health authorities say the person ate lunch at Shadow Lawn restaurant in Rothesay, N.B., on May 6 and attended the John Cleese show at Harbour Station on May 7.

People who were at the restaurant that day or who were at Harbour Station on May 7 seated in Section 26, rows 14-20 or Section 27, rows 14-24, are encouraged to contact their health provider.

The first person with a confirmed case of the measles, visited the Halifax Infirmary emergency room last month and later went to the ER and X-ray room at the Saint John Regional Hospital.

Officials say anyone who visited the Halifax Infirmary on April 17 and the Saint John hospital from April 18 to April 22 could have come in contact with the disease and should check their immunization records and watch for symptoms of measles.

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Public health officials have confirmed the first infected patient recently travelled internationally.

Measles is a highly contagious infection and can be prevented with a vaccine. Most people who contract the virus make a full recovery.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States, one of out of every 1,000 people infected with measles will develop acute encephalitis, which often results in permanent brain damage.

The agency adds that one or two out of every 1,000 children who are infected with the virus will die from respiratory and neurological complications.

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