Skip to main content

Ontario Education Minister Stephen Lecce said high school class sizes this year would only increase to an average of 22.5.

Christopher Katsarov/The Canadian Press

Ontario Education Minister Stephen Lecce says he is open to negotiating a smaller boost to class sizes with teachers.

The government announced in the spring that high school class sizes would rise from an average of 22 to 28 students over four years.

It says that will means 3,475 fewer teachers in the system, but that will be through not filling positions when teachers quit or retire – the government says there will be no “involuntary” job losses.

Story continues below advertisement

Teachers have warned that the changes will lead to fewer course offerings and extracurricular activities, and that some classes, specialized ones, in particular, would balloon in size.

Lecce says today that high school class sizes this year would only increase to an average of 22.5.

Ontario is also in the middle of bargaining with teachers and education workers, and Lecce says he is open to changing the plan to increase class sizes if teachers and boards can propose other ways to find cost savings.

Our Morning Update and Evening Update newsletters are written by Globe editors, giving you a concise summary of the day’s most important headlines. Sign up today.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter