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Ivy Wick is shown in a Calgary Police Service handout photo.

The Canadian Press

Calgary police want to know whether anyone has evidence that a three-year-old girl who died last year suffered from ongoing physical abuse.

Police were called to a home in Calgary nearly a year ago about a child in medical distress. The girl, Ivy Wick, died in hospital in early October.

Doctors who assessed Ivy when she was brought to hospital did not believe her injuries were caused by a fall. An autopsy revealed she died from blunt force trauma.

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Her death is being investigated as a homicide. Police say other injuries on Ivy’s body suggested she may have been physically abused.

“Given the injuries that Ivy has sustained, it is possible that additional people may have noticed signs of abuse or been aware of abuse prior to Ivy’s death,” Staff Sgt. Martin Schiavetta said Thursday.

“We’re certainly suspicious that abusive behaviour was occurring and injuries related to that behaviour would be observed by family members or by people that came in contact with Ivy.”

Schiavetta said investigators want to hear about anything that may have occurred up to six months before the girl’s death including screaming, yelling or unexplained bruising. Ivy was sent to hospital at least once before she died, he said.

The little girl’s mother and her boyfriend, who is not the child’s biological father, have not been helpful, Schiavetta added.

“We did give them the opportunity to tell us the truth and we do not believe they’re truthful at this time,” he said. “I would use the word unco-operative.”

Schiavetta said investigators are still gathering evidence because “the burden of proof is very high.”

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“We’re hoping that other people may be able to further our investigation.”

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