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The Quebec government is planning two concerts involving a total of 25,000 spectators in September as an experiment to examine the impact of COVID-19 on large gatherings and to help relaunch the entertainment and tourism industries.

Researchers at Laval University will oversee the two shows, which will be held in the Quebec City area, Tourism Minister Caroline Proulx said Monday. Public-health authorities hope at least 75 per cent of Quebeckers are fully vaccinated by then.

“The goal is to have a test concert sometime in September that would reproduce the conditions prepandemic,” Ms. Proulx told reporters in Quebec City. “The goal is to help the event industry, which has been severely hit by the pandemic, to fully resume its activities in a safe environment.”

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Quebec is touting itself as the first province to attempt such an experiment; similar ones have been held in cities such as Barcelona and Paris.

The experiment will involve two shows – a 20,000-person outdoor concert and a 5,000-person concert indoors, Ms. Proulx said, adding the government estimates the events will cost a total of between $2-million and $3-million. More information will be announced in the coming weeks as academics iron out the protocol, including vaccination requirements and whether masks or physical distancing will apply, Ms. Proulx added.

Sophie D’Amours, rector of Laval University, said if another wave of novel coronavirus hits the province, then authorities may cancel the shows. “If the situation gets worse, there’s a chance the concert will not occur and it’s taken into consideration when you design the protocol,” Ms. D’Amours told the news conference.

On Monday, Quebec Health Minister Christian Dubé said officials had administered a total of 10 million COVID-19 vaccine doses and its campaign was making progress with people 18 to 29 – who have the lowest first-dose vaccination rate in the province. Mr. Dubé said 70 per cent of that age cohort had received at least one dose or had been scheduled to get one.

Health officials on Monday reported one death attributed to the novel coronavirus since their last report on Friday and 239 new COVID-19 cases, 61 of which were identified Sunday. Officials said since their last report, hospitalizations dropped by six, to 78, and 23 people were in intensive care, a drop of two. They said 53,370 doses of COVID-19 vaccine were administered Sunday.

Quebec’s public-health institute says 83 per cent of Quebeckers 12 and up are vaccinated with at least one dose while about 55 per cent are considered fully vaccinated.

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