Skip to main content

Bernie Williams, right, who has been an advocate for women in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside for 30 years, testifies at the final day of hearings at the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, in Richmond, B.C., on April 8, 2018.

DARRYL DYCK/The Canadian Press

A much-anticipated report on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls is set to be released to the public in June.

The four-person commission asked to examine the causes of violence against Indigenous women and girls announced today it will hold a closing ceremony in Gatineau on June 3.

It says the commissioners have completed their report but the federal government has agreed to delay its release to ensure “the highest quality of translation.”

Story continues below advertisement

The final report is to include stories from more than 1,400 family members and survivors of violence, as well as experts and officials who delivered testimony at 24 hearings and statement-gathering events in 2017 and 2018.

The commission says more than 800 people also shared stories through art.

The inquiry has been scrutinized throughout its work due to the rate of staff turnover and the 2017 resignation of a Métis commissioner from Saskatchewan.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Comments are closed

We have closed comments on this story for legal reasons or for abuse. For more information on our commenting policies and how our community-based moderation works, please read our Community Guidelines and our Terms and Conditions.

Cannabis pro newsletter