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Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a Security Council meeting via videoconference at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow on April 7.Mikhail Klimentyev/The Associated Press

The Russian government slapped sanctions on 61 Canadians Thursday, prohibiting them from entering Russia in what Moscow called retaliation for measures enacted against its own people.

The sanctions targeted politicians, government officials, journalists, military leaders and academics.

The measures were imposed as Russia’s military assault on Ukraine nears two months in duration. Canada has hit Russia with a slew of punitive sanctions over the aggression and has sent $110-million in military aid to Kyiv, with another $500-million promised, including heavy artillery.

Russia’s Foreign Ministry said in a statement those Canadians named are “directly involved in the development, substantiation and implementation” of a “Russophobic” approach to Moscow.

Those targeted include Bank of Canada Governor Tiff Macklem and Canada’s ambassador to the United Nations, Bob Rae, as well as Katie Telford, chief of staff to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and Michael Sabia, deputy minister at the Department of Finance.

A number of Canadian premiers were also named, including Ontario’s Doug Ford, Manitoba’s Heather Stefanson, Saskatchewan’s Scott Moe, Alberta’s Jason Kenney and B.C.’s John Horgan.

Among the journalists named are Globe and Mail editor-in-chief David Walmsley and Globe senior international correspondent Mark MacKinnon, as well as Catherine Tait, president of Canadian Broadcasting Corp./Radio Canada, and Michael Melling, head of CTV News.

“We acknowledge today’s move by Russia. Sanctions will not stop our essential role of bringing the story to our readers,” Mr. Walmsley said.

Moscow also targeted senior military brass as well as Canadian soldiers who commanded Canada’s Operation Unifier training mission in Ukraine since 2015.

Political staffers were not spared. Among those hit were Cameron Ahmad, director of communications to the Prime Minister, and Brian Clow, deputy chief of staff to Mr. Trudeau.

Also named were Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson and Toronto Mayor John Tory.

Roland Paris, a former foreign-policy adviser to Mr. Trudeau and director of the graduate school of public and international affairs at the University of Ottawa, said the measures have little practical effect.

“This scattershot list is Russia’s version of retaliatory sanctions, but they are mostly symbolic. I don’t expect that many Canadians on the list had any plans to visit Russia in the near future.”

Below is the full list of sanctioned Canadians:

  1. Cameron Ahmad, director of communications in the Prime Minister’s Office.
  2. Steve Boivin, Commander of the Special Operations Forces Command.
  3. Jeremy Broadhurst, senior adviser in the Prime Minister’s Office.
  4. Shelly Bruce, chief of Communications Security Establishment.
  5. Craig Baines, Commander of the Royal Canadian Navy.
  6. Halyna Vynnyk, president of the League of Ukrainian Canadian Women.
  7. David Vigneault, director of Canadian Security Intelligence Service.
  8. Terry Glavin, columnist.
  9. Balkan Devlen, senior fellow at Macdonald-Laurier Institute.
  10. Roméo Dallaire, former senator.
  11. Ryan Deming, Commander of 8 Wing at Canadian Forces Base Trenton.
  12. Luc-Frédéric Gilbert, Commander of Canada’s Operation Unifier training mission in Ukraine.
  13. John Ivison, National Post columnist.
  14. Martine Irman, chair of the board of directors at Export Development Canada.
  15. Jason Kenney, Premier of Alberta.
  16. Brian Clow, deputy chief of staff to the Prime Minister.
  17. Dan Costello, foreign and defense policy adviser to the Prime Minister.
  18. Frederick Côté, former commander of Operation Unifier.
  19. Melanie Lake, former commander of Operation Unifier.
  20. Shuvaloy Majumdar, senior fellow at Macdonald-Laurier Institute.
  21. Sabrina Maddeaux, National Post columnist.
  22. Mark MacKinnon, senior international correspondent with The Globe and Mail.
  23. Tiff Macklem, Governor of the Bank of Canada.
  24. Roman Medyk, chair of the BCU Foundation.
  25. Michael Melling, head of CTV News.
  26. Borys Mikhaylets, president of the Ukrainian League of Canada.
  27. Scott Moe, Premier of Saskatchewan.
  28. David Morrison, deputy minister of international trade at the Department of Global Affairs.
  29. Al Meinzinger, Commander of the Royal Canadian Air Force.
  30. Ketty Nivyabandi, secretary-general of Amnesty International Canada.
  31. Sandra Aubé, chief of staff at Global Affairs.
  32. Robert Auchterlonie, Commander of Canadian Joint Operations Command at Canadian Armed Forces.
  33. Mike Power, chief of staff to Defence Minister Anita Anand.
  34. Alain Pelletier, deputy commander of NORAD.
  35. Bob Rae, Canadian ambassador to the United Nations in New York.
  36. Michael Sabia, deputy minister at Department of Finance.
  37. Brian Santarpia, Commander of the Canadian Armed Forces’ Maritime Forces Atlantic and Joint Task Force Atlantic.
  38. Jill Sinclair, Canadian representative to the Ukrainian Defence Reform Advisory Board.
  39. Heather Stefanson, Premier of Manitoba.
  40. Ryan Stimpson, former commander of Operation Unifier.
  41. Michel-Henri St-Louis, acting commander of the Canadian Army.
  42. John Tory, mayor of Toronto.
  43. Patrick Travers, senior foreign policy adviser in the Prime Minister’s Office.
  44. Jeffrey Toope, former commander of Operation Unifier.
  45. Catherine Tait, president and chief executive officer of Canadian Broadcasting Corp./Radio Canada
  46. Katie Telford, chief of staff to the Prime Minister.
  47. David Walmsley, editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail.
  48. Jim Watson, mayor of Ottawa.
  49. Graham Flack, secretary of the Treasury Board.
  50. Doug Ford, Premier of Ontario.
  51. David Fraser, retired major-general of the Canadian Armed Forces.
  52. Michael Harris, columnist.
  53. Tasha Kheiriddin, columnist.
  54. Sarah Heer, former commander of Operation Unifier.
  55. John Horgan, Premier of British Columbia.
  56. Leslie Church, chief of staff to the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance.
  57. Janice Charette, interim clerk of the Privy Council and secretary to the Cabinet.
  58. Richard Shimooka, senior fellow at Macdonald-Laurier Institute.
  59. Chris Ecklund, founder of FightForUkraine.ca.
  60. Lloyd Axworthy, chair of the World Refugee and Migration Council.
  61. Oz Jungic, senior policy adviser in the Prime Minister’s Office.

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