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Aaron Gibbons, who was killed in July 2018, is among 30 Canadians awarded bravery decorations by Julie Payette, seen here on Dec. 12, 2019, on behalf of the Queen.

Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press

A Nunavut man who was mauled to death while protecting his kids from a rare polar bear attack has been awarded a posthumous Star of Courage by Canada’s Governor-General.

Aaron Gibbons, who was killed in July, 2018, is among 30 Canadians awarded bravery decorations by Julie Payette on behalf of the Queen.

At the time of his death, RCMP said the 31-year-old Gibbons was on an island along the west coast of Hudson Bay and put himself between the bear and his children when the bear charged toward them.

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Ms. Payette also awarded the Medal of Bravery to 29 people, according to a statement published Saturday in the Canada Gazette.

Another 36 Canadians have been awarded meritorious service decorations, including one Canadian Armed Forces member whose identity is being kept secret for security and operational reasons.

Recipients, or their family members, are to receive the awards in a ceremony at a later date.

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