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The Canadian military’s Snowbirds aerobatics team is seen in a file photo. The team is returning to full operations after a crash grounded the planes in the U.S. for more than a month.

Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press

The Canadian military’s Snowbirds aerobatics team is returning to full operations after a crash grounded the planes in the United States for more than a month.

Military investigators are still trying to determine why one of the Snowbirds’ famous Tutor aircraft crashed on Oct. 13, prior to an air show at the Atlanta Motor Speedway in Georgia.

But the military says the aircraft flew back to their home base of Moose Jaw last month without engine trouble and operations have been restarted after a thorough risk-assessment process.

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Captain Kevin Domon-Grenier sustained minor injuries when he ejected from the plane, which crashed into a farmer’s field, but no one else was hurt.

The team’s spring training remains delayed as the investigation continues.

This year marks the 50th season of Snowbirds performances at air shows across Canada and the U.S. They are considered a key tool for raising awareness about – and recruiting for – the air force.

Lieutenant-Colonel Denis Bandet, the acting commander of the Snowbirds, said he has complete confidence in the aircraft.

“Our maintainers are world-class and take meticulous care of our fleet and the Royal Canadian Air Force has a robust risk assessment process to ensure we conduct operations in as safe a manner as possible,” he said in a statement.

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