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Canada Trudeau condemns hateful, ‘toxic segments’ of society after New Zealand mosque shooting

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivers a statement on the terrorist attack in New Zealand following Question Period in the House of Commons on Mar. 18, 2019.

Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is calling on people of all political stripes to turn the page on hateful ideology by condemning intolerance following the killing of 50 Muslims in New Zealand.

A visibly angry Trudeau denounced the “small, toxic segments” of society that peddle the belief diversity is a weakness, spewing hatred and inciting violence.

Hate groups “are alive in Canada,” Trudeau told the House of Commons on Monday as party leaders expressed solidarity with the victims in Christchurch and their families.

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Trudeau expressed sorrow at the many attacks in recent years that have taken the lives of defenceless people at temples, churches, synagogues, concerts, schools and malls.

Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale suggested the deadly mass shooting in New Zealand will spur parliamentarians to take a careful look at Canada’s gun laws.

The massacre has sparked a global sense of concern that will prompt Canadian politicians to make some timely decisions, Goodale said Monday after appearing before a Senate committee.

Goodale said his cabinet colleague Bill Blair will deliver recommendations soon, after having been asked last August to study a full ban on handguns and assault weapons in Canada.

New Zealand’s prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, says gun-law reforms will be announced within days in that country.

A bill already before Canada’s Senate would, among other things, expand the scope of background checks on those who want to acquire guns here.

“I’m sick and tired of extending our thoughts and our prayers. People around the world are exhausted by the carnage,” Trudeau said. “We must counter this hatred, and together we will.”

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